Living Sales Excellence - Dennis Connelly's Blog

Dennis Connelly

Recent Posts

Top 3 Salesperson Success Factors

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Mon, Nov 27, 2017 @ 17:11 PM

New England Patriots coach, Bill Belichick was asked during an interview before the Superbowl last year, what the most important attributes football players had to have to be on his team. He said, “Love of football, hard work, and unselfish.” Whether you love him, or love to hate him, by most measurements he does what he does quite well. Indeed, he’s a winner. Rather than look at the details of how to win a football game, let’s take a look at the principles he uses to win often, which is more applicable to winning at sales.

 

33600772_s_Belichick-Huddle

 

Notice that he didn’t say “strength, speed, and size” among other attributes – the stuff most of us might intuitively assume is of primary importance. He didn’t say yards-per-carry, interceptions caught, or number of sacks – nor anything related to how well the on-field statistics capture a player’s competence in their role.

Clearly, he is getting enviable outcomes year after year. He has amassed a winning record that compares with a handful of the greatest coaches of our era including UCLA basketball coach, John Wooden (read Wooden on Leadership); Tennessee basketball coach, Pat Summit (read Raise the Roof), Dolphins coach Don Shula (read Everyone’s a Coach), or the lesser-known New Zealand All Blacks Rugby coach Graham Henry (read Legacy). So what is Belichick looking at that others might be overlooking? What can we learn from his strategy, as sales leaders, to ensure we have “players” on our team that make us winners and make our competition envious at least or even “hate” us, if we’re lucky?

When selecting salespeople, many managers look for attributes such as a good personality, likeability, strong drive, past success, eye contact, or a firm handshake. And very often they want to see knowledge of the product or industry on their resume. While this might give one comfort that the right choice was made, will it consistently predict that your new hire will be successful selling what you sell, in your environment, to your market? Our extensive research says no.

Picking through the data from this research, and reviewing the findings of the assessments of over one million salespeople and their managers (using ongoing research from Objective Management Group), there are visible patterns that emerge that identify what managers might look for to pluck the elite players from the rest of the pack, or even the good from the entirely, umm, not so good, that upon initial observation are not easy to spot. Most interestingly, some of the most important analysis looks at specific elements of character that are similar to Belichick’s big three. In fact, it’s not hard to see a similar pattern in Jon Wooden’s simple success formula of Conditioning + Fundamentals + Unity (Love of the game + hard work + unselfish).

We all know that there are plenty of NFL players with strength, speed, size, and knowledge who even with all that still don’t perform as predicted. If you draft, trade, or hire enough of them, after much weeding, you might have a decent team. But earning seven Superbowl rings, as Belichick has, takes something else – looking at hidden attributes that we might also tap to ensure we don’t waste time and energy on weeding through player after player. To be the best, an understanding of this difference could make all the difference. One of the New Zealand All Blacks mantras is “better people make better All Blacks.” Not better players; better people – Unity, Unselfish.

Belichick’s three key attributes are also less tangible and not as easy to spot. Everyone can see size, strength, and speed. It takes more effort, care, attention, and recruiting skill to see if there is “love of football, hard work, and unselfish.” Wouldn’t it be great if there was an easy way to measure it? What do we need to look at, to give us the edge, in the role of a sales manager who has the responsibility of ensuring that we have the best people?

Belichick’s big three show a strong emphasis on environment and culture over knowledge and skill. Our research over three decades tells us that the sales equivalent of the factors one must possess to support the right environment and culture could be characterized as follows:

Top 3 Success Factors for Salespeople

  1. Grit – Desire, Commitment, Outlook, and Motivation
  2. Responsibility – No-excuse attitude
  3. Coachable – I’m not already the best.

Grit is increasingly cited in recent literature as a primary factor in success. For more on that, view Angela Duckworth’s TED talk that has now been viewed 11 million times. Let’s take a closer look at these critical character traits.

Desire

We’re interested in desire for success in sales as opposed to simply desire for success. Behavioral styles tests such as DISC, while useful for creating better internal communication, miss this important distinction. If being a “salesperson” is a stopover on the way to another career, or just the result of a belief such as “I will make more money,” the desire to be a successful salesperson might not reach a level of that of a top performer on your team, even if this is an otherwise success-driven person and even if they have written personal goals and a plan to meet them! It must be specific to sales.

Commitment

To many managers, the word Commitment sounds interchangeable with Desire, but the confusion leads to one of the more common reasons why new hires don’t work out. We see their strong desire and assume they’ll walk through walls to get there. If they have a high desire for success in sales, they might come across as just the person you are looking for. However, without understanding what they are willing to do to reach that success level, you’re taking a not-so-small risk, as OMG data has shown for the past three decades.

Anyone with teenagers understands this phenomenon. A kid might want to own one of those cars they saw in a James Bond movie, but sleeping till noon and taking endless selfies won’t usually help them get there? They might have the desire, but not the corresponding commitment.

Outlook

How do you feel about your work, your life, your friends, your direction, your general state? Is the glass half-empty or half-full, or are the contents moldy? Your outlook comes with you to work and affects your ability to do what needs to be done and ultimately, your success.

In a scene from the HBO television show, Game of Thrones, when the character, Aria is being trained in sword fighting, her teacher notices her mind is elsewhere. “You are with your troubles,” he says, and continues, “When you are with your troubles,” he explains, pausing long enough to dance around her with his sword until she is on her back lying on the hard stone floor, “…more trouble for you!,” he says.

If we measure a poor outlook in a pre-employment assessment, we want to probe that a bit, and ask about it in the interview. Is it related to the simple fact that they are currently out looking for work, or is it a common feature of their daily life independent of circumstance.

Motivation

If you want to motivate someone, find out what already motivates them. Where is their motivation coming from? When I coach managers and executives, I often hear the statement, “I don’t know how to motivate this person.” My first question is, “How well do you know them?”

Do they love to win or hate to lose? Do they like pressure from a superior or do they apply pressure to themselves? No right or wrong answers on that; if you know you need pressure from above, then set up an environment that creates that and it will help your success, or find an “accountability partner” to help remind you to do the things you know you need to do. Do you compete against others or against yourself? Do you like recognition or is self-satisfaction more important? …and many others.

In a sales force evaluation I reviewed with a client two weeks ago, we found that the two most motivated salespeople were motivated in opposite ways. Any one approach the manager adopted would motivate one while demotivating the other. Only a tailored approach would be effective.

Is your motivation extrinsic or intrinsic? In other words, does it come from outside rewards or is it more internal or even altruistic? In the book, Drive, author Dan Pink uncovers research that shows that we are motivated mostly by three things: autonomy, growth, and purpose – all intrinsic. Money can still be a driver but for most of us, it usually isn’t a primary driver unless you don’t have enough to meet basic needs. Since 2008, intrinsically motivated salespeople are now the majority at about 54%. Incidentally, there are certain compensation models that can reconnect even the most intrinsically motivated among us to their own bottom line.

If you are interested, recent new data from Objective Management Group regarding the latest statistics on motivation in salespeople was revealed by Dave Kurlan in this article.

Responsibility – No Excuses

Measuring “responsibility” provides a yardstick on how willing someone is to own their outcomes, both desirable and undesirable. When things don’t go right, which way is the finger pointing? Is it pointing out there at someone or something, or back at you? Does it depend…? As a manager, have you ever heard, “Well at the last minute, the competition lowered their price and got the business? There was nothing I could do about it.”

Having a “no-excuse” policy for yourself and for your team doesn’t mean there aren’t legitimate reasons that things go wrong outside of your control. It means that you aren’t wasting your time on them. The focus, rather, is on what is within your control that you could do or could have done to change the outcome. The excuse prevents learning because it provides a psychological out, and gives away all the power to the subject of the excuse. It feels good in the moment because it gets you off the hook, but it ultimately makes you powerless to make important changes.

Coachability

My spell checker always puts a red line under the word, coachability. (It just did it again. Hey, programmers!, it’s cromulent.) Being coachable is a predictor of professional growth. It doesn’t mean that one isn’t already great…if they are. Rather, it’s about limiting oneself. If we are closed to all but our own personal views and experiences, we cut off receiving potentially useful knowledge from others who might contribute in some manner to our continued success.

When we think we know it all, it’s unlikely we’ll take anyone’s advice. I teach a training module called Improvement Dynamics™ that illustrates our limits by describing the nature of the very next deal that we almost got. It’s the one we might have closed, but didn’t. Each of us has such a deal or opportunity over any time frame of your choice, regardless of the breadth of our experience or of our sales ability. One can ask themselves what skill they need to refine, what activity they need to do more, or what belief they should update so they can close that very next deal that they otherwise would have missed.

Regarding uncoachable salespeople, if someone is already on your team and having success and beating targets every quarter, but you can’t tell them anything they already “know,” there can be value in keeping them on your team, but they must be managed differently. However, if we follow the logic of people like Belichick and Wooden, then being “unselfish” or insisting on an environment of “unity” might be more important to your overall success than protecting an attitude problem merely for their incremental sales numbers, while the team suffers.

The 3 Success Factors

In short, we could summarize the critical qualities a salesperson must possess if you want your team to have the edge, as Grit, No Excuses, and Coachable. There are many more attributes and skills that contribute to sales success, of course, and you can read about the 21 core competencies of salespeople in this article by Dave Kurlan. However, these three success factors must be present because the other skills and experience necessary for success won’t be enough to compensate for if these qualities are missing.

These “big three,” however, are a subset of the 21, and gaining an understanding of what they are and how to spot them is not just about having good salespeople, but about gaining the edge in your market. They are instrumental for shaping your environment and fostering a culture of constant improvement.

Where else have we seen this emphasis on culture make the difference in defining winning teams? In the sports world, Belichick has a lot of company including many great coaches and managers both today and before his time that have witnessed the benefit of environment, culture, and character over more obvious commonly-measured skill sets.

John Wooden coached UCLA to seven consecutive national championships by specifically de-emphasizing victories in favor of behaviors. Wooden would say, “Winning takes talent; to repeat, it takes character.” Vince Lombardi said, “Collective character is vital to success. Focus on getting the culture right; the results will follow.” And then there’s the All Blacks rugby team who looked for, “…high work rate, strong body movers, guys that were unselfish and had a sacrificial mindset.” Sound familiar?

Using radical new thinking about statistics, Theo Epstein helped the Red Sox break a “curse” and win the World Series. But when they started to lose in subsequent seasons, there was infighting and finger-pointing that made it difficult to recover their former glory. While other teams were hiring statisticians and quantitative analysts to find the next big inefficiency in the game, Epstein left the Red Sox and went to the Chicago Cubs with a simple approach that followed on what these great coaches mentioned above had discovered – find good players with the right character. Once again, the statistics were important, but character was more important.

Epstein said, “If we can’t find the next technological breakthrough, well, maybe we can be better than anyone else with how we treat our players and how we connect with players and the relationships we develop and how we put them in positions to succeed. Maybe our environment will be the best in the game, maybe our vibe will be the best in the game, maybe our players will be the loosest, and maybe they’ll have the most fun, and maybe they’ll care the most. It’s impossible to quantify." Sounds a lot like, “Better people make better All Blacks,” doesn’t it?

With this mindset, he went on to help the Cubs’ break their 103-year “curse” and win the World Series. Perhaps the curse had been self-inflicted all along and someone needed to step up and own the problem. No excuses. What problems do you have at your company that you can choose to decide are happening because you haven’t found a solution.

As the NFL gets into the swing of the second half of the season, fans will be watching to see what Belichick achieves with this year’s team of new and old faces. When asked how he deals with personality problems in the locker room, he said, “We don’t have them.” New England fans know this as they’ve watched great players get shown the door when they became more important than the team.

Who on your team is helping you win? And who, despite their experience, knowledge, skill, and individual success is holding you back from meeting your company’s true sales potential? What are you going to do about it?

 

Photo credit: Copyright: giorgiorossi73

Topics: sales management best practices, Great salespeople, recruiting better salespeople, sales selection

Top 6 Rules for Writing Emails that Get a Response

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 @ 23:11 PM

How many times do you write an email to a prospect and get no response? How often do you think, "My product makes so much sense for this prospect that if they only agreed to have a conversation, we'd be doing business." Here's a recent real-life example from my work with a client that I believe will give you insights and tools to dramatically increase the likelihood of getting an actual response.

33714589_s_EmailWriting-1_111317_Blog

The target for this email could be on your top 50 prospect list or it could even be an existing transactional customer who hasn’t been farmed in a few years, as was the case in this example from just two weeks ago, though the lessons are widely applicable.

In particular, this kind of email is useful when you believe it is squarely in your prospect's best interest to have a conversation with you. We often work and re-work those emails, sending them off into the darkness, and listening for a response, hearing nothing but crickets. We’re about to increase your odds of success. Read on.

So let's set this up. I received the following email from a sales manager at one of my client companies:

Good morning Dennis,

One of my sales reps is working on sending an existing customer an email to try to get a meeting to get reconnected. We’ve been doing business with some of their properties for years without fuss, but we know they have a lot more and there has always been reluctance from this gentleman to work with us or even see our value. He inherited our services when he took over the role he's in and he's always been skeptical. The old business is essentially just hanging on and frankly, we're a little afraid of calling attention to it.

We have not had a business review with this client for many years nor any communication. My rep’s initial attempt at an email to this guy was lengthy and provided a lot of information - probably too much. Thinking about what she learned in the training sessions, she shortened it to the note you will see below, which is much better, in my view, but still doesn’t seem quite right. Didn’t know if we could review it this morning in our regular coaching call.

Thanks,

Sarah, Sales Manager

--

Here is the email that Sarah’s business development sales rep, Jill, wanted to send to this prospect, who was high on her target list for her company's initiative to farm old customers and grow their accounts:

Dear Mr. Janson,

Hope you are doing well today. I work for Agency Solutions, Inc. We work with management companies to help them find hidden sources of revenue on their properties without the burden of taking time to negotiate and administer all the ancillary contracts on their own, especially when they are usually unrelated to their main revenue sources. I would like the opportunity to come and meet with you in person. I have the following days/times available, please let me know which one of these will work for you:

  • November 16 – anytime from 8:00 – 1:00
  • November 17 – anytime from 8:00 – 10:00 or 1:00 – 5:00
  • November 20 – anytime from 8:00 – 5:00
  • November 21 – anytime from 8:00 – 5:00
  • November 22 – anytime from 8:00 – 5:00

Thank you,

Jill

--

Take a look at her letter and ask yourself what you might change:

  • How is she positioning her company?
  • What's the message she's sending about herself?
  • What could make this email more effective?
  • Is the prospect likely to read the whole thing?

We will never know the answer to these questions because she never sent the email. Phew! But we can draw from our experience, make some educated guesses, and suggest changes that might increase the chances of a favorable outcome. Whether you're a salesperson, business development expert, or a sales manager, what edits would you suggest?

Later that morning, I met with Sarah and the President of Agency Solutions, her boss, so we could dig into this email and see if we could improve it. I'm going to share with you what we came up with, but first, let’s pick out the key points and make some comments:

  • “Dear Mr. Janson” – Let's start there. That kind of salutation works better for some but not all members of a certain age bracket and I recently read an article about email etiquette in the Middle East and it recommended starting off that same way. However, it’s usually better to position yourself as a peer. So let’s use “Hi Frank,” or “Dear Frank,” or simply, “Frank,” your choice. If you disagree with this and want to keep it formal, then continue doing it the other way, especially if it’s helping you engage better, differentiate yourself, develop rapport, and position yourself as an advisor at their level whom they can trust.
  • “Hope you are doing well today?” – The body of the letter starts with this. It usually means, “Warning, this is a sales letter so you can stop reading now.” If you wouldn’t kick off an email to your best friend that way, don’t do it here either. Oh, you mean Frank Janson isn’t your best friend? Fine. Pretend he is, and he just might become one.
  • “We work with management companies to help them…” – This is pretty good, but I’d rather use “I,” for starters because in sales today, and particularly when there is product parity, the best differentiator is often you. And the phrase “work with…companies” removes you too much from the specific people you help so perhaps you might dive right into “I help managers…” I love the whole rest of that sentence.
  • “I would like the opportunity to come and meet you…” – Wait a minute. Whose opportunity is this? So what you're saying is, “Please, oh mighty prospect, grant me your time for my personal opportunity, and while it’s possible there might be something in it for you too, at least you know that I have myself in mind from the outset.” The only opportunity here is a chance for your prospect to receive much-needed help. Don’t make it about you.
  • “I have the following times available…” After this sentence, the email continues to list times and dates that add up to 38 hours of available time over five consecutive business days. Now there's a message for you. “Listen, Mr. Janson, I’ll try to stay awake that week in case you call. In fact, I’ll put the phone next to the TV so I’ll be sure to hear it. With any luck, you’ll be my first customer in months. We’re going to have some fun together, buddy, cuz my schedule’s clear sailing to the new year!”

Okay, now that we’ve had some fun with this, let’s take a look at how we changed it during our 30-minute call later that morning. When we finished, Sarah, the sales manager, gave the copy to Jill to send off to Frank. Here's what she sent him:

Frank,

I’m sorry we haven’t contacted you in some time, even though we are already representing some of your properties. I wanted to reach out and introduce myself, to set up some time to understand your needs better and see if and how I can help.

Would you be available to meet in the next couple of weeks? I am available on the following dates:

  • November 16 – From 10:00 to Noon
  • November 17 – From 1:00 to 3:30

Please let me know what might work or suggest another date and time.

Thank you,

Jill

--

There are other methods we could have used and other approaches to this particular challenge including picking up and dialing the phone. And Jill surely had that on her tactical roadmap, but as everyone in the trenches knows, calling prospects on the phone is an increasingly frustrating method for making initial contact. I once cold-called a CSO of a Fortune 1000 company with whom I had never spoken. To my amazement, he answered the phone. However, before he’d even let me tell him why I called, he said, “I answered the phone because I happened to be expecting a call from someone with your area code, so can you call back another time?” Hey folks, this doesn’t only happen to you.

Almost immediately after our coaching session on the phone, Sarah sent the new email copy to Jill and two hours later, I received an email from Sarah who had forwarded a note she just received from Jill:

Sarah,

OMG! I got a reply within an hour of reaching out. I’ll forward it to you! Holy Crap – he even tells me some of the issues they have….

Jill

--

Success! While not every email gets a response so quickly, if at all, what lessons can you take on how you might improve your email outcomes? Here are my top six rules for getting prospects to respond:

Top 6 Rules for Effective One-Off Email Prospecting So They Respond

  1. Position yourself as a peer on their level.
  2. Make it all about them.
  3. Don't talk about your stuff as it gives them a reason not to respond.
  4. Make the purpose about helping them if they need it.
  5. Your time is a scarce resource. Narrow the choices.
  6. Remember it's their opportunity, not yours.

If you took something valuable from this article, please leave a comment. I’d love to hear from you.

--

For those interested, a few times a year, we host an open-enrollment live online training series for individual salespeople in a group environment who are trying to improve their game and master the most effective and easiest to learn sales process ever. The next session can be found by clicking here.

--

Photo Copyright : file404

Topics: Sales Coaching, better coaching of sales people, advanced selling skills, prospecting emails that work, sales communication, writing

Two Most Critical Challenges When Managing Professional Services Sales Teams

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Mon, Oct 30, 2017 @ 17:10 PM

Professional services companies pose unique challenges for sales leaders and managers in two important ways: one strategic, the other tactical. Just in the past month alone, three companies of this type have asked for help and their issues are closely related.

85669208_s_ProfServ-Biplane_103017_blog

Copyright : John Malone

 

The story usually sounds like this. Sales are strong, but growth is flat. The professionals (delivery experts, practitioners and subject matter experts) are too busy to adequately hunt or farm new business, selling abilities differ dramatically, and individual growth goals are undefined. Sales process, if there is one, is ineffective. The professionals don’t have the skills, sales DNA, and training to execute corporate goals.

 

Take a breath – there’s more! Business development people who focus solely on new business have too many masters and unclear goals. And the worst of it might be that the biz-dev team brings the professionals into the sales process too early, short-circuiting an effective sales process. Lastly, compensation is leading business development people to focus on services that aren’t aligned with business goals.

 

Aside from that, everything’s perfect! Right? But remember I said there were two challenges for sales leaders, and if those challenges are properly addressed, the issues above can be resolved and they can get back to growing the business at expected levels.

 

The strategic challenge is defining the reporting and operational structure so the right people are doing the right things and reporting to the right people. The tactical challenge is effectively managing more than one type of sales role, while motivating, coaching, and holding the whole bunch accountable.

 

Let’s look at the strategic challenge first. The business development role tends to be newer in professional services companies because competitive pressure has increased more rapidly in recent years. Information is widely available to clients and it’s harder to differentiate. Further, professionals used to get by mostly on their ability and reputation. Today, to really make rain, they need a set of skills more closely associated with selling: hunting, qualifying, farming, and closing, for example. For many, these are new skills and their expertise is not at a level consistent with their professional skills and mastery.

19856368_s_ProfServ_103017_blog

Copyright : ximagination

In addition to the above selling problem, there are usually questions about organizational structure. Who should report to whom? How should they be compensated and how should it align with corporate goals. Like learning a card game, the rules are just the rules; the real strategy emerges as you play. Similarly, compensation systems are eventually “gamed” to serve the financial interest of the salesperson. That’s not a problem; it’s normal. However it’s best for companies to understand this and ensure that the compensation plan puts the cheese in the same place for salesperson and company alike.

 

The tactical challenge for professional services companies is day-to-day management of the sales organization. Typically, there hasn’t been one to manage. The professional service practitioners incentives are more aligned with the company. The company grows either because they are growing their own business, or more professionals/partners are hired. As a result, there is limited knowledge of sales management competencies including recruiting, motivating, coaching, accountability, pipeline management, sales process, CRM, and relationship building. If sales process is an issue, here's a quick tool to find out how your's measures up.

 

First, is there a dedicated manager? The usual early mistake is to have service line leaders manage business development people on the occasion when there is a prospect who is interested in their service line. This means the salespeople have as many bosses as service line leaders, which means they have no boss, no real manager, and therefore not enough accountability.

 

While each company structure is different, from experience, I can state with reasonable confidence that unless you have one to three business development people who are completely self-winding and who also make it rain every month without supervision, you need a dedicated manager who possesses the tools needed to perform the managerial leadership function. How does your team compare? Click here to find out.

 

The sales manager must have a longer time horizon than the business development people they manage, and the cognitive capacity to challenge them at a level appropriate to their specific place on the learning curve. They must understand each person’s motivations. We look at seven different motivational tendencies, for example, when evaluating salespeople. It’s difficult to motivate people without knowing how they are motivated and what already motivates them. Motivation is like martial arts. Managers get better results when they use their people’s motivational energy to direct and guide them rather than trying to change their direction entirely.

 

A dedicated manager is in a better position to coach to the sales process without letting other distractions limit this most critical of functions. Coaching can be a term of art with definitions that sometimes include any interaction between a manager and salesperson. However, getting this right makes the difference between merely knowing what’s going on and creating an environment where constant growth and improvement is a daily norm and part of the culture.

 

There is much written about how to coach and we hold a two-day sales leadership intensive twice a year with a heavy emphasis on coaching, but here’s something you can takeaway right now. Schedule a regular, predictable, formal 30-minute coaching session with each of your people twice a week. In the session, focus on only one opportunity using plenty of role play until there is a distinct “a-ha” moment. Imagine the capability of your team after six months of that?!

 

Without overwhelming you with too much information, the last critical competency to discuss, with respect to the value a dedicated manager brings to the business development team of a professional services company, is accountability. Service line leaders have a lot to think about and many constituents to serve. It’s easy for the activities of the business development team to get lost in all that noise.

 

Sales managers are in the best position to know what activities are important on a daily basis and to hold the team accountable. Again, without trying to hold a two-day seminar, here is a quick way to think about activities. Start with goals and work backward. I’ll keep the math simple in the following example.

 

If you desire one new client per month per salesperson, look at your closing percentages at each stage of the sales process to calculate the appropriate daily activity. One client might demand two closeable opportunities. Two closeable opportunities might mean four prospects with compelling need to do business, which might take eight meetings. To get eight meetings, you might need 16 conversations. To get 16 conversations, you might need 160 leads. So every day, I need each salesperson to reach out to eight people (8 x 20 days per month = 160). What equation works for your firm?

 

I hope this helps the many professional services firms working on this very problem today. In short, strategically, the organizational structure must be supportive of growth. The right people are doing the right things and reporting up through an organization that has the time and skills to support them, at all levels. Tactically, sales managers have the requisite skill sets to effectively motivate, coach, and hold their people accountable using best practices and proven tools. Find out if your team has what it takes by clicking here. Getting this right means nothing short of writing a new story, this time with a happy ending.

Topics: effective sales leadership, Management Assessment, Hierarchy of Sales Coaching, professional sales

Sales Accountability Lessons from the Emergency Room

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Mon, Aug 15, 2016 @ 10:08 AM

10127196_s_DoctorsRushing-1.jpg

I noticed the nurses and doctors rushing past me one afternoon as I lay on a gurney, parked in the hallway of a busy ER. Reasonably sure, by then that my spooky, painful experience was just kidney stones, I turned my focus to all that rushing about.

Over the course of a few minutes, a nurse, then another nurse, then a doctor, and several more, rushed by, all moving quickly to the same place past the central desk and part way down one of the halls. They weren’t running, exactly, but they were moving pretty fast.

Then I overheard one of them yelling over her shoulder, “I’ll look that up in five minutes,” she said, “I have to get to our huddle!” I felt like a kid hearing a siren and waiting to see the fire trucks, only to realize that it’s just the noon alarm in the center of town.

One of the more indispensible tools for the world-class sales manager is the huddle. Yet it is often neglected due to real or imagined time constraints. Why?

For sales managers, the morning huddle is primarily an accountability tool, to help salespeople stay focused on the most important top-line pro-active behaviors that will help lead to the results they want. That might seem like something salespeople wouldn’t love. However, executed properly, by a sales manager that has embraced the huddle, sees the value in it, and wouldn’t live without it, the salespeople in turn, also love it. And here are the top reasons:

Top Three Reasons Why Salespeople Love the Huddle

  1. Gets everyone feeling like they a part of something bigger.
  2. Creates a team spirit.
  3. Leaves them uplifted and energized 

And here are the Top Three Reasons Why Sales Managers Love the Huddle

  1. Creates peer-oriented accountability
  2. Builds bonds and energizes the group
  3. Provides a daily conduit to provide strategy, direction, and clarity to the team

Of course, this assumes it is done right. On the flip side, can you imagine that it doesn't always go this way? It’s probably not hard to believe that there are some real time-wasting huddles out there. Welcome to the land of Dilbert, where the manager drones on and everyone is checking their emails. Okay, when I hear about how much people don’t like it, these are the usual reasons:

Top Three Reasons Why Salespeople Hate the Huddle

  1. Too much criticism or too negative
  2. Always runs long so cannot plan around it
  3. Types of activities reported are inconsistent with stated goals
  4. Boring waste of time

When the Huddle has been commanded from above because of something an executive read about online or learned at a conference, and the manager herself is not bought in, the results are predictable.

For the past 30 years starting with my first introduction to huddles from a coating manufacturer, I have found this tool to be one of the most indispensible for the well rounded sales manager who shapes their environment and gets results; the same kind of manager who has mastered coaching. For more on coaching, read this article. I consistently hear that huddles are the one thing they would never give up. 

If doctors and nurses in a busy emergency room put saving lives on hold to have their daily huddle, we can certainly take 10 minutes a day from our 50-plus-hour weeks to make sure all those hours are used in such a way that success is unavoidable.

Topics: Sales Coaching, accountability, top sales leadership, sales managerment, daily huddle

Consultative Sales Lessons from the Beach

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Wed, Apr 06, 2016 @ 11:04 AM

Parrots-BeachHawkersArticle_3.jpgCan you learn something about selling from a trip to the beach? I hope so, or I'll have a hard time writing off part of my trip. When I go there, which for reasons that will become apparent is not often, I cover myself completely and sit in the shade of a large umbrella. Then, like a pre-historic sundial, the umbrella is moved around the chair as the day passes, keeping me in the shade. It's a lot of work. Clearly, visiting a sunny place wasn't my idea, but let's make the most of it, shall we? Have you ever noticed the people who walk along the beach selling stuff? How would you like that job? At some resorts, there will even be a few vendors invited onto the property to sell people by the poolside, and this is where I got the chance to observe hand-to-hand sales up close. What fun!

Two salespeople walked from person to person: one with a parrot, and one with a camera. The offering was to have your picture taken with the bird, and later in the day, prospects would go to their office and purchase the picture. Before I get too far in this discussion, I want to be clear that this is not an article about how to sell stuff at the beach. So if you sell cloud computing, staffing solutions, mobile apps, building materials, construction equipment, television advertising or one of 732 other product and service categories, I promise there are lessons for all of us. 

One of the more simple rules in sales, that some find difficult to execute, is that one should be focused more on the prospect than on the product, at least in the early stages of the discussion. Yet when most of us first start working at a new firm as a salesperson, among the first things we learn are the products and services we offer. So this is where the confusion starts. To be sure, knowing your products is critical to your success, after all, and your ability to present them is often the prerequisite for the sales manager letting you get out there all by yourself. There is little attention paid to your ability to sell, because most companies do not measure it, or don't measure it correctly. In the movie, Tommy Boy, we see that the "teacher" wasn't much better than the student in this area, even though he could say, "the spectrometer readout on the nickel-cadmium alloy mix indicates a good rich strobe and fade, decreasing incidence of wear to the pressure plate," as though he was describing the omelet he had for breakfast.

Seldom is sales taught by companies specifically to improve selling skills. It’s like when teachers know their subject matter, but not how to teach it. Have you ever had a teacher like that? How was that class for you? What did you learn? One could ask the same about salespeople who haven't mastered selling. Have you ever run into a salesperson like that? How was that experience? At some stores, you’d grow old waiting for someone who could do more than simply read the product description on the shelf tag as easily as you can.

So back to the beach. The pitch goes like this, “How about having your picture taken with a parrot?” Let's look at the components of that question more closely. First, they mentioned the picture, which is essentially a description of the service they are providing. (So far, it's about them.) Next, they mention taking “your picture” which is how you fit in, but it's still part of the description of their product. (Also about them.) They just hope you have a need for such a thing. That’s not selling; that’s hope. I recommend the book, Hooked on Hopium by Michael Shannon for more about that. Lastly, they mention the parrot, which even though you can see the parrot, it is a just another feature of their product. (Again, it's them-based.)

So how did this play out? Less than 3% of the people encountered said, "yes," and presumably some of them only because they felt pressure, but with no intention of purchasing later. That 3% might be enough for them of course, but why not double or triple it, if you can? I bought the photo shoot of course, because I wanted a picture for this blog article, a fact entirely lost on them due to their ineffective sales process and inability to uncover any reasons why I might want to buy what they were selling that day. They must believe that the reasons to purchase are self-evident. How many of your people know your products and services so well, they believe your prospects' reasons for buying it from them are also self-evident? Sometimes, you still get the sale, as they did in this instance.

So how could they improve their odds of success and close more deals? How about using some of the same strategies that my clients use? What if we focused on the prospect? What if we made it all about them? It might be impossible to do initial research on our prospects in this case, but we are at a resort, after all, so we could assume that they probably have a smartphone and a Facebook account and they probably plan to tell their friends about the trip. If we're savvy enough to understand generational differences, then if our prospect is under 30 years old, they probably don’t use their Facebook account, and if they are under 20, they might not even have one, though perhaps they have Instagram and Snapchat, instead.

So we might ask something like any one of these questions, not necessarily in this order and not without waiting for responses and making it more conversational: “Have you posted on Instagram today to all of your fans? What are they missing out on today? Is it fair to say that you’re probably having more fun than they are? Is that the kind of thing you like to show each other? What are they expecting to see when you send them a picture? Are they expecting just a shot of you and your friend and that cool drink in your hand? What would it take to surprise them? Do you like surprising them? Is that what you guys usually do for each other? So if they saw a picture of a bird licking your face, would that do it? Would that be a "win?" Would that make them laugh? Tell me about it.” And so on.

Parrots-BeachHawkersArticle-2.jpg

Okay, this is just one approach and there are lots more, and I was only giving you your half of the conversation. Use your sensory acuity to determine the best conversational direction for your prospect. The point is that you are focused on them, not you. You could ask them if they have a wall of photos at home.  “I bet you have lots of friends and family on that wall, and lots of faces, but no colorful tropical animals, right?” Once they are connected to the outcome – a unique post, a more interesting photo wall, or just more cheerful gloating – closing the deal follows naturally. "How about making that happen right now?"

As you read this, you might protest, “But the way they are currently asking is much quicker, ‘Would you like a picture with a parrot?’” See, they can quickly move from person to person, right? Yes, that’s true. But we aren’t interested in speedy conversations, we’re interested in closing more sales. Slow it down to speed it up. You've probably heard that many times before. In your business, ask yourself which part of the conversation you should slow down, in order to speed up the sale?

At a two-day sales training intensive in the mountains of Montana last week, we talked about slowing down the conversation to speed up the sale. “If they want a price now,” a salesperson asked, “why wouldn’t we give it to them?” And she continued, “I can only spend so much time with each prospect.” Hmm, I thought. “How long is your sales cycle?” She responded, “Averages thirty days,” So I asked, “How much is an extra 45 minutes going to throw that off?,” adding, “What if 30 days turned into 15 days as a result, or five, or one?”

How many of your salespeople can move past product knowledge and become more effective at selling? How many of your sales managers recognize that the products, services, and the intricacies of your industry are only prerequisites to selling and that mastering selling skills is the difference required for high performance? How much of your onboarding includes learning an effective sales process and helping your people clear away the mental blocks and self-limiting beliefs so they can execute it? Take five minutes and fill out this sales force grader to see where you stack up compared to other companies. And if you're interested, click here to receive a white paper on the Modern Science of Sales Force Excellence. The next time you're looking to unwind away from home, I suggest someplace cool and cloudy. It's less labor-intensive.

Topics: Consultative Selling, sales process, sales book, hunting, beach

The Emperor's New Sales Brochure

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Tue, Oct 27, 2015 @ 14:10 PM

In a coaching call early this week, my client asked me a marketing question that I hear quite often but never wrote about until now. To answer their question, I am going to divulge research results from a study we did here at Kurlan & Associates that up to this point, has not been widely shared by Dave Kurlan, who conducted the study.

We get a lot of marketing questions but it should be noted that our primary area of expertise is sales and not marketing. We are concerned with the “top of funnel” hand-off from marketing to sales, however. And we are also concerned with the role that marketing can play to position products and services in alignment with sales messaging so salespeople will have better conversations. That's why we tend to get questions related to this crucial hand-off period.

So what was the question? It was this: “Would it help our cold-calling efforts to send out a brochure to prospects prior to calling them?” Have you ever asked that question? Have you tried it? Did it work? I bet it did. But I bet you’ll be surprised by the results of our study.

Here’s how the study worked. We divided prospects randomly into three groups. Let’s call them Group A, Group B, and Group C. To each group, we either sent a brochure ahead of the cold call or we didn’t, according to this schedule:

Group A
To Group A, we instructed our client to make a normal cold call. We did not send a brochure prior to this call. This was our “Control” group.

Group B
To Group B, we sent out a brochure to prospects. We then followed up with a call that started with, “Hi, this is so-and-so from such-and-such. Did you receive the brochure I sent you last week?”

Group C
To Group C, similar to Group A, we did not send a brochure, but we made a cold call and instructed our client to start the conversation with, “Hi, this is so-and-so from such-and-such. Did you receive the brochure I sent you last week?” If you noticed that Group B and Group C said the same thing, then you are one very astute reader.

So Here’s the Summary
Group A: No brochure sent. Cold-called the prospect.
Group B: Brochure sent. Followed up with a call asking if they got the brochure.
Group C: No brochure sent. Followed up with a call asking if they got the brochure.


Photo Credit: ©blotty/123RF.COM and Dennis Connelly

And Here’s the Results
Group A, the cold-callers, were able to convert the call into a meeting one out of 10 times. 1 in 10.

Group B, the folks who sent the brochure out first and then followed up with a call, did much better, converting twice as many calls into meetings. 2 in 10. So now you know the answer to at least one question. It’s better to send out a brochure first and then call. You will have a much better conversation rate than simply cold calling by itself.

Putting ethics aside for a moment, there are two reasons why you might want to try what Group C did – either you are pressed for time and don’t want to wait for a mailing, or you are short on stamps and don’t want all that return mail clogging your actual brick and mortar (or aluminum) mailbox. There’s a third reason I should mention that you might want to try what Group C did, which is that their conversion rate was three out of 10 calls. 3 in 10. This is 50% more than group B and 200% more than Group A. This result surprised us. We were expecting it to be the same as Group A and certainly no better than Group B.

How can this be? There are a few explanations that appear to be at work in Group C and not in the other two. 

  • Group C knew in advance that the prospect hadn’t seen the brochure so there was no worry about their opinion of it
  • They had a useful conversation starter
  • The prospect, feeling a little guilty for not seeing it, might have given them a little extra consideration
  • Knowing the prospect’s answer ahead of time gave the salesperson more confidence

So now let’s get back to ethics. Do you really want to start off your relationship with your prospect with a lie, acting as if you did something you didn’t do? Keep in mind that with Group C, there was no brochure sent at all. What made the difference was the mindset of the salesperson.

So how can we learn to bring the more successful, Group C mindset to the call every time without dishing all the bullcrap? Which skills and what hidden weaknesses might be holding us back?

  • Do your salespeople develop early rapport?
  • Are they confident and credible?
  • Do they ask questions easily, and listen carefully?
  • Are their positioning statements aligned with prospects real issues?
  • Can they create urgency?
  • Do they recover from rejection quickly?
  • Do they have excellent sales posturing?

How many of your salespeople can be developed to hunt and close new business effectively? How well does management coach them and hold them accountable? How motivated are they and what actually motivates them? Are you training the right people? How many cannot be trained? If these are top of mind questions for you, a sales force evaluation will answer them. Click here if you would like to learn more about that.

By getting salesperson selection right, training and coaching existing salespeople, and ensuring alignment with leadership and corporate goals, you will improve the quality of your sales organization. You will improve sales efficiency, preserve margins, and create more success for you and your people.

 

Photo Credit (Top): ©MarinaGallud/123RF.COM

Topics: sales force evaluation, sales training, sales recruiting, sales candidate selection, Sales Coaching, coaching salespeople, hiring sales candidates, coaching sales managers,

Sales Candidate Selection and the Product Knowledge Fallacy

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Fri, Oct 16, 2015 @ 14:10 PM

16337353_s_ChicagoMercantileExchangeTradingFloorIn a recent sales management training session, one of the managers spoke up about what he believed were the qualities needed in sales candidates that would perfectly fit his business. “They must have,” he confidently stated, “at least 20 years experience in the industry. They must know the product, know the customers, and be able to price the stuff off the top of their head.” I thought he would add that they must also know how to ride unicorns without holding the reins, but he didn’t. Do you share this view about the requirement of industry experience and product knowledge?

I asked him how long he had been in the business. “Thirty years,” he said. I asked him if he sucked for the first 19. He said “no.”

Dave Kurlan recently wrote a fantastic science-backed series of articles on getting the selection criteria right for sales candidates, showing how to predict with 92% accuracy whether they would be successful. Click here for Part 1 and click here for Part 2 of that series. He even showed how to get at least as good as 83% accuracy predicting the success of recent college grads!

To analyze the “Perfect Fit,” he looked at 26 different criteria related to things like selling skills, beliefs and selling-specific “DNA,” all within a selling context for that business in that selling environment. Guess which one was not on the list. You’re right! It was Industry Experience.

Now having said all that, to reduce, but not eliminate, the pushback to this article, let me be clear. Industry knowledge is important for selling. In fact, you better know it, because your prospect does. This is the internet age, after all, and working within that context is precisely the challenge of this new era for today’s salespeople. If you want to help your prospects, it’s good if you know more than they do. But in this same era, it is not often the case that you know more, and because of that, you need to bring something else to the table. Otherwise, you risk bringing nothing new but your price.

Selling is hard enough on it’s own. In widely-respected business author, Dan Pink’s book, To Sell is Human, Pink shares with the rest of the business community what you and I in sales already know - that sales is a profession. Knowledge about an industry, a product, or a service is just that – knowledge. Selling is a profession that requires skills and abilities that need to be learned, tuned, and practiced. Selling acumen, selling skills, and selling-specific “DNA” is more important to your success than industry experience or product knowledge, even if that experience and knowledge are requirements for your success.

In many areas of life, we see people getting stuck on details that masquerade as the real story. The map, after all, is not the real territory. It’s just someone’s representation of the territory. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, who wrote The Black Swan, learned this on the trading floors of Chicago, New York, and London. In his book, Antifragile, he writes of a very successful trader of Green Lumber at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange who genuinely thought the lumber was painted green rather than that it was simply ‘freshly cut,” and this was after years of trading it! And he was darn good at it. That’s one example. Here’s another. The guy in the London Exchange considered to be one of the very best traders of Swiss currency at the time, could barely place Switzerland on a map and didn’t know what languages were most commonly spoken there. It was Taleb who coined the phrase, ‘Green Lumber Fallacy,’ to describe this phenomenon. We could call it the Product Knowledge Fallacy in our world.

Goodness! What’s wrong with these people who don't know what they are trading or who aren't superstar experts in their product? The answer is, nothing. They are excellent at what they do. The problem is with our observers' view of what we think is important. And when we’re immersed in an area of expertise and know all the players and all the nuances about the product, it’s easy to mistake the map for the territory.

Getting back to my recent sales management training session, this one manager, as stated earlier, insisted that any new sales candidates have at least 20 years of experience in working with ‘fluids’ such as hydraulic fluid and motor oil. After a five-minute role-play, with the manager playing the part of the prospect, he, and the others in the room comprising managers and VP’s, with an audible gasp at the conclusion, were disposed of this belief. For a transcript of the role-play, click here.

How often does your company get sales selection right?

  • Does your selection criteria need to change?
  • Do you attract the very best candidates?
  • Is your selection process efficient and effective?
  • Is your compensation aligned with the job description?
  • Will your on-boarding process support retention of the very best?

You don’t always have to know what green lumber means to be successful selling green lumber. Sometimes we miss what is most important because we are fooled either by conventional wisdom or by our own misconceptions. And just because sales candidate selection at your company hasn’t given you satisfactory results, doesn’t mean the selection process cannot be optimized going forward. Try using the same accurate and predictive sales candidate assessment tool that has been voted best Sales and Marketing Assessment Tool four years in a row at the popular sales website, TopSalesWorld.com. Learn more here.

Photo Credit: ©Demetrio Mascarenas/123RF.COM

Topics: sales, sales candidate selection, recruiting, WCSO, roleplay, evaluation, OMG Assessment, sales managerment

How Can Consultative Selling Already be Dead?

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Thu, Apr 30, 2015 @ 06:04 AM

 

obsolete11.jpg

In this article for Middle Market Executive,Tom Searcy insists that Consultative Selling is dead.  He says that consultative sellers end up with buyers who can only make small decisions, experts end up in purchasing and only industry authorities can reach executive decision-makers.  He also says that consultative sellers ask, "what is your pain?", experts say, "here is your pain", and authorities say, "here is the pain your industry is having and how you can uniquely overcome it."

Is he right?

Read the entire article on Dave Kurlan's Blog

Topics: Dave Kurlan, Consultative Selling, sales methodology, sales force evaluation, objective management group, Tom Searcy

Top 12 Reasons Why Sales Methodologies Fail

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Mon, Mar 09, 2015 @ 12:03 PM

sales methodologies

 McKinsey & Company did a study and documented that 75% of solution selling efforts were considered failures after only three years. I read this statistic in a book about sales conversations and was struck by it, but perhaps not why you might think. The authors went on to make a bold leap of logic. It’s the “messaging behind the methodology” that’s the problem, they concluded.

Why did this statistic jump off the page? It wasn’t because solution selling isn’t working. We know about its limitations. It wasn’t because they said “the right messages” are the key. I am sure that a good message is important. It wasn’t because I was shocked that most sales initiatives fail. That’s why I’m in this business.

It struck me because it’s almost exactly the same statistic as the number of salespeople who suck, 74%. Maybe they were rounding; I’m not. After assessing over 800 thousand salespeople, that’s the resulting number, and has remained consistent for the last three decades. It makes sense that the weaknesses at the salesperson level would scale up to organizations more generally. Without understanding why that happens and without understanding the impact of management, most sales process implementations will be doomed to failure.

Let’s take a look at what might be going on under the hood, but I’d like to start with two quick definitions:

What is a sales process? These are the specific steps you follow on your way from a lead to a closed piece of business. What are the stages along the way? What are your milestones within each stage? How do you know you completed a stage? How does that inform your pipeline and allow you to forecast?

What is a methodology? This is how you go about executing certain steps within your process. Solution selling, for example, is a methodology that suggests that you find out what your prospect needs and present a solution from your basket of goods or services. There are many others, including some that work well depending on the specific stage of the sales process.

We know there are lots of sales processes and methodologies. It could be that your “messaging behind the methodology” is not good enough, as the book suggested, or it could be that the messaging is only an important component of the execution of the whole process. Messaging, as described, is really a methodology itself. In a sales process, messaging is most important at the beginning, when you are getting the attention of your prospect, and at the close, when you are confirming your value differential.

In both cases, you are talking about whom you help and how you help them. At the beginning, your message refers to a hypothetical person, but presumably one just like your prospect with the same kinds of problems. At the end of the sales process, we’re talking about exactly your prospect, because now we have enough knowledge to do so, and furthermore, you identify the manner in which you help that highlights what your competition doesn’t have or doesn’t do well, but that your prospect needs. I believe that was the key message of the book I was reading.

Most salespeople don’t follow a process. To be precise, 90% of salespeople don’t follow a process. We know that because we asked 800,000 salespeople if they had one and 90% said they didn’t. Could that be indicative of the problem with your team? Just having a process, of course, won’t solve the problem, as the opening statistic from McKinsey pointed out. But without one, you’re wandering in a darkened Fun House at Coney Island hoping you bump into the exit door.

Most salespeople don’t use a methodology either. In my view, a good methodology should tap into what is already fundamental about selling and make it easier to follow so that everyone can use it. Dave Kurlan’s Baseline Selling, for example, accomplishes that.  Since Baseline Selling has a sales process built into it, the methodology component is comprehensive because it covers the entire process. When salespeople learn a methodology, sometimes it only covers a portion of the process.

To make matters worse, even when salespeople memorize a process and learn a methodology, they won’t necessarily execute it unless they have the skills and the underlying DNA. They might have to remove psychological barriers and other hidden weaknesses to clear the path. To learn more about this phenomenon, read this excellent article by Dave Kurlan.

So if most salespeople don’t have a sales process and don’t use a methodology, or if they do, it’s incomplete, and if most salespeople are missing important skills or have hidden weaknesses that prevent success, the fact that 74% of salespeople suck should be believable. As you might have guessed, that number isn’t a guess; it comes from those same 800,000 salespeople assessed by Objective Management Group, covering some 140 million data points.

It’s not enough to point out the failure of an incomplete and probably poorly executed launch of a methodology like “solution selling” and declare that messaging is the answer. There could be lots of other reasons for the failure rate.

Here are my Top 12 Reasons that Sales Methodologies Fail

  1. Leadership’s ability to create change
  2. Management’s impact on the sales force
  3. Inappropriate or incomplete methodologies
  4. Incomplete sales process
  5. Not following a sales process
  6. Too many skill gaps
  7. Hidden weaknesses
  8. Not enough training
  9. No reinforcement
  10. Ineffective coaching or simply not enough coaching
  11. No follow-through
  12. Lack of accountability

An evaluation of your sales team would reveal why your sales aren’t improving as much as you believe they could be.  It might be, after all, how you are messaging. It’s more likely, however, that it’s not that simple.

The first step is gaining an understanding of what is required to get your desired outcome. The next step is finding out what is standing in the way. We don’t have to guess, and we don't necessarily have to add a complicated message that only the elite 6% can execute. It’s best to measure precisely what is needed and construct a plan that results in a team that, regardless of your message, knows how to find a way to close more deals, faster.

By improving your sales force so that the bottom 74% are trained up or out; and by improving management to effectively recruit, coach, motivate, and hold people accountable; and by selecting the right processes and methodologies for your business, it’s much more likely that you won’t find yourself among the 75% in the graveyard of failed initiatives.

Topics: Hidden Weaknesses, sales process, sales methodology, sales management, sales evaluation, sales skill gaps

What Do Partisan Politics Have in Common With Hiring Salespeople?

Posted by Dennis Connelly on Wed, Dec 31, 2014 @ 12:12 PM

sales recruitingWelcome to a non-election year!  Isn’t it nice?  While last year is still fresh in our minds, I’d like to call your attention to that political noise once again.  Emory University did a study of partisan-political thought proving that we are not easily knocked out of our belief systems.  No surprise there.  More interesting about the findings is that once we believe something, our bias can run so deep that we’re unaware of our logical mind often disengaging when contradictory evidence is presented to us.  They could actually see this in brain scans.  Don’t we see this whenever we try to convince someone who just doesn’t seem to want to get it?  And how often are we that very person?

We get so much satisfaction, and as the study revealed, even pleasure from what supports our beliefs that we’ll actually construct evidence if necessary.  Our emotions overwhelm our ability to think rationally.  On the brain scans, the reasoning area of the brain goes dark in these circumstances.

Okay, here’s another one.  When we are distracted, it’s hard to stay focused.  Again, no surprise.  But see if you can pass this selective attention test.  Go to this site and click on the arrow to start the video.  Do not read below as you will see the answer.  Read the question and see if you can do it.  It’s a lot harder than you think.  Millions have already tried this and perhaps you are one of them.  But if not, you might be surprised at how difficult it is.  Some of you might follow the action well enough to get the right answer, but you would be among the very few.

So if I told you that there is no such thing as a sales personality, how would you change your thinking about salespeople?  If I told you that your social impression doesn’t count for much when selecting a sales candidate, how would that change how you hire?  After administering over 800,000 individual sales assessments that includes over 140 million data points, Objective Management Group concludes beyond any doubt that this is true.  It’s worth noting that this OMG test has won the Top Sales award for assessment tools for the fourth year in a row beating out nine other finalists (if that helps convince you).

So what does count?  Following decades of groundwork laid by Dave Kurlan, here is my Top 10 list in no particular order:

  1. Desire for success in sales (not just success)
  2. Commitment to do what it takes to succeed in sales
  3. A positive outlook
  4. Doesn’t make excuses
  5. Not too many hidden weaknesses
  6. An ability to prospect
  7. The skills to close a sale
  8. Account management and farming skills
  9. Trainability and Coachability
  10. Prior success selling in a similar selling environment in which you operate

What’s not on this list?  Drumroll, please.  Here is my Bottom 10 list:

  1. A firm handshake
  2. A warm smile
  3. The gift of gab
  4. Great looks
  5. Perfect diction
  6. Ready with a good joke
  7. Promptness
  8. Has all the right answers
  9. A great resume
  10. Excellent references

Gosh, “excellent references” is on the Bottom 10 list?  Yup.  A poor reference would be valuable information.  An excellent reference isn’t very useful.  It’s rigged after all, isn’t it?  Many items on this second list might seem like nice things to have, but they won’t predict success selling at your company.  The right combination of the Top 10 list, plus a few other dimensions, can make that prediction with very good accuracy.  To find out whether your candidate possesses these attributes, one must gather over 150 data points.  How many skills comprise the Closer Skill Set, for example?  Try this sample assessment on one of your candidates.

Are you using the right selection criteria to hire your salespeople?  Are you expert at interviewing sales candidates?  Do you attract the best candidates?  Do you cast your net wide enough to ensure the best candidates are in the pool?  Can you change your beliefs when presented with facts and data?  When focused on one set of attributes, can you shift your attention and notice what’s even more important?  Like in partisan politics, we often believe what we want to believe about someone, such as a sales candidate, and overlook what really matters.  Are you able to transcend the lens of your beliefs and see the truth?

 

Copyright: 123RF Stock Photo

Topics: Dennis Connelly, sales, sales recruiting, hiring, recruiting salespeople, hiring salespeople, sales selection tool, sales selection, objective management group



Dennis-Headshot1 
 

 

Subscribe to Email Updates

Scan the QR Code with your smartphone for immediate access to Dennis Connelly.

Dennis Connelly LinkedIn

Follow Me

Connect

Or Ask for Help 

               Email Me

Sales Leadership Intensive 

http://www.kurlanassociates.com/sales-leadership-event/

Most Popular Posts