Elite Salespeople are 26 Times More Effective at This Competency Than Weak Salespeople

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Tue, Aug 14, 2018 @ 11:08 AM

pitcher

As you know, I'm a baseball guy.  I wrote the best-selling book that merged baseball and selling, my son is a ranked high school catcher and I use baseball analogies in many of my articles.  With apologies to soccer, hockey, football, basketball and golf fans, no sport is more analogous to selling than baseball.

Before we get to sales and the data, let's take a quick dive into the most important skill position in baseball, pitching.  Even that's a sales word!  Pitchers don't have to throw hard if they have great control and effectively and consistently locate their pitches.  Hard throwers don't need to be as precise as long as they have a second and third pitch to keep the hitters off balance.  Pitchers who throw hard, locate their pitches and have a 4-pitch mix are elite.

One group of special pitchers are the closers.  They typically enter games in the 9th inning, throw hard and close out the game.  For example, Craig Kimbrel, the Boston Red Sox closer, has been such a guy.  Entering play on August 14, 2018, he has appeared in 49 games, pitched 49 innings, has amassed an amazing 75 strikeouts and has saved 35 games in 39 chances.  At the other end of the spectrum, less effective pitchers usually fail in the closer role because they don't dominate the hitters.

Pivot to sales.  Elite salespeople don't need to close and weak salespeople suck at closing.  Want proof?  Let's review some data from nearly 1.8 million evaluations and assessments of salespeople conducted by Objective Management Group (OMG).  You can see and play with the data here.

closer-competency-1

Only 108,000 out of 1,800,000 salespeople are strong at the closer competency and 63,000 of them are from the elite top 5% and the next group of 20% who are strong.  This proves that salespeople who are strong at the 7 Sales Core Competencies that precede closing don't need to be strong closers.  Those 7 competencies are:

  • Hunter Competency
  • Sales Process Competency
  • Relationship Builder Competency
  • Consultative Seller Competency
  • Value Seller Competency
  • Qualifier Competency
  • Presentation Approach Competency

The data also proves that the remaining 75% of salespeople who are serviceable or weak and also ineffective at most of the 7 Sales Core Competencies that precede closing, can't close even when they try!  Closing is so overrated!

Join the discussion of this data on LinkedIn.

Image Copyright iStock Photos

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales core competencies, objective management, closing deals, OMG Assessment, delayed closings

Companies Rush to Get This One Thing in Place for their Sales Teams Before January

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Dec 01, 2016 @ 06:12 AM

baseball-scorecard.jpg

I've been writing about the importance of having a milestone-centric sales process for a decade and Objective Management Group's (OMG) data is showing that companies - and their salespeople - have finally begun to make some serious progress in this area.  Ten years ago, only 9% of the sales population was following a formal, structured sales process.  Today, that number has crept up to 32%.  

Over the past few years, the majority of calls and emails I have received about sales process have been from companies asking for help buiding a sales process that their salespeople will actually follow and, more importantly, one that will work.  But that's changing too.

Over the past few months, the majority of the calls and emails coming in have been to get help building predictive scorecards.  Yesterday alone I spoke with the CEO's from 3 companies about building and slotting scorecards into their existing sales processes.

Why the sudden rage over scorecards?  

Eariler his year I wrote about scorecards a couple of times.  In February I raved about Membrain's built-in scorecard and in October I wrote about scorecards as the key to a predictive pipeline.

So the question is: Is this hype or is the scorecard a true game changer?

I don't know how many scorecards the experts on my team have built for our clients, but my personal clients tell me that the scorecard I built for them has changed their world.  Their win rates are way up, their sales cycles are shorter, their salespeople are more confident about the opportunities they have decided to pursue, and they have more time and resources to devote to those opportunities.

In short, scorecards are the scientific way to transition from going after every opportunity and hoping to close a small percentage of them, to identifying which opportunities to pursue and closing all of them.

Scorecards are a simple concept but they get tricky in the final stages.  You must be able to accurately:

  • Identify consistently predictive conditions
  • Weight them properly
  • Set the proper cut-off

If you fail to get each of those things just right, you'll have scorecards that won't work the way you hoped.  It's crucial to get all three variables right the first time.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales process, shorten the sales cycle, closing deals, win rates, scorecard

How Can a Simple Zero Derail a Sale or Deal?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Jan 07, 2015 @ 13:01 PM

derailment

Copyright: 123RF Stock Photo

Today, I was coaching a very talented salesperson, one who is even better at getting deals closed.  Yesterday, he closed a large deal when late in the day, and completely out of nowhere, he got the dreaded "we changed our mind" email.  This is his story.

When I debriefed him, it was apparent, even to him, that there was a moment toward the end of the meeting when he had happy ears.  He gets that.  He knows what he should have asked.  What really bothered him was, "Why did this happen?"   Not why did the deal come undone, but why the happy ears?  What caused his usually reliable and steady emotions to betray him?  And we better figure this out quickly because he was beating himself up so badly that blood would surely be dripping from his head at any moment now.

He accepted my statement about his having an emotional reaction at that moment in the call, but was adamant that it was abnormal.  We discussed the one thing that was different about this opportunity than others like it.  This opportunity was triple the size of his average sale and challenged his money tolerance.  Money Tolerance becomes a Sales DNA weakness when the deal size exceeds the amount at which money becomes "a lot" to the salesperson.  In this case, the deal had an extra zero and far exceeded this salesperson's conceptual $50,000 limit.

Bob's sales call was a veritable chain reaction - a 3-car pile-up.  The prospect said something, an alarm went off in Bob's mind, but instead of addressing it, asking a question, setting expectations, and clarifying that everything was still OK, he ignored it and hoped for the best.  That alarm was the voice in his head that pointed out that this deal was different.  There was a $50,000 commission at stake.  It was bigger than most.  It became more important than most.  That was his Emotional reaction to the Low (in this case) Money Tolerance.  The Tendency to Become Emotional is another Sales DNA weakness.  Those 2 weaknesses caused another Sales DNA weakness to rear its head.  Fear of Rejection would not ordinarily be an issue for Bob, but in this case, it was the truck that smashed into the first two cars that had collided.   Fear of Rejection morphed into the second voice Bob heard in his head.  It said, "You'd better not ask about that because that might cause you to lose the business.  Better just shut up and hope for the best!"

It's funny, but once Bob understood what happened, he calmed right down, called his prospect, and was able to calmly and expertly resurrect the deal.  Like I said, Bob is a very talented salesperson, but even great salespeople can be hindered by emotions, money and fear when the circumstances are right.

The bigger issue is salespeople who aren't elite, and how frequently they are besieged by some or all of the dozens of issues like these that affect salespeople, sales cycles, sales win rates, and revenue.  Would you like to know how, when, where, and how frequently your salespeople are impacted by things like this?  Watch this 4-minute video to learn about our Sales Force Evaluation.

evals

The year's first issue of Top Sales Magazine is now available for download.  In addition to articles by the heavy hitters of sales consulting and training, do take the time to read my article on page 8 - "What You Think Versus What I Think about Consultative Selling".

Topics: sales training, Sales Coaching, closing deals, hidden sales weaknesses, deals that blow up

How to Use Playlists to be More Effective at Selling

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 @ 09:02 AM

By now, many people have either an iPad, iPod, iPhone or MP3 Player to create playlists for music.  Your playlists might include favorite songs of a particular genre, such as "Rock" or "Jazz"; for a certain setting, such as "Dinner" or "Poolside"; or simply a collection of your favorite songs.  Of the thousand or so titles on my devices, perhaps only 200 of them are songs that I love and they appear on multiple playlists.  But there are another dozen or so selections that actually move me.  I feel something.  I suppose it's similar to the members of a concert audience who are not only dancing, but moving in such a way that they believe they are actually part of the band - "Hey everybody, look at me - I'm part of this performance!"  You know who you are....

My analysis showed that of my dozen or so "move me" tunes, a couple are "Big Band" performances, a couple are "Jazz", a couple are "Rock", a couple are "Classic Rock", one is "Classical" and two are "Ballads".

It got me thinking about sales -- what doesn't?

I attempted to group my clients from over the years into playlists, for lack of a better term.  Not from the perspective of who was a favorite, but more from the aspect of the sales calls themselves.  From the hundreds I reviewed, I asked myself, "Which were the routine sales calls where nothing out of the ordinary occurred, and which sales calls or cycles moved me?  Which were extraordinary?  When did something powerful occur?"  It might be completely different for you or your salespeople, but I did find some that were meaningful from an "I felt something powerful" happen.

There were the firsts - first "Big One", first "Win Against the 800-Lb. Gorilla", first "Strategic Win", first "Win in an Industry", etc.

But the deals that stood out - the deals that moved me - were those when at first the client wanted to buy something completely different from what we eventually did together.  They wanted to spend a small amount of money on a relatively small service and instead they spent 10 times that amount on a more significant service.  And don't think that I simply upsold them.  That never happens.  Clients get what they truly need.  Clients don't usually know what they really need, but instead often identify what they think they need.  Clients hardly ever know what their problems truly are, but some have identified symptoms.  What always moves me is when I help a client gradually realize that what they need is something different from what they believe they want.  It should.  After all, that is what selling is all about.  Providing people with exactly what they ask for is called order-taking.  Differentiating your company from that of your competition, by quoting lower prices, is called discounting, not selling.  Salespeople who do that are not among the top 26%.

If you ask your sales force to go through the same exercise - separating the deals that moved them from those that were routine - which customers and clients show up on the list?  What put them there?  Was it simply the difference between order-taking and selling?  Was it something else, like having to overcome resistance?  I believe that you and your salespeople will discover that when they actually engage in selling, the deals are special.  When they simply take orders, or discount to buy the business, the deals are routine.

 

Topics: Dave Kurlan, order taking, true selling, closing deals, playlists

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Best-Selling Author, Keynote Speaker and Sales Thought Leader.  Dave Kurlan's Understanding the Sales Force Blog earned a medal for the Top Sales & Marketing Blog award for six consecutive years. This article earned a Bronze Medal for Top Sales Blog post in 2016 and this one for 2017. Read more about Dave.

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