Why You Must Understand This about Desire for Sales Success

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Aug 20, 2014 @ 06:08 AM

desireOne of the most frequent questions we get from clients has to do with the second most important finding on Objective Management Group's (OMG) sales and sales management evaluations.  "This is one of my top salespeople - how can she possibly lack Desire for sales success?"

It's a great question and I hope to explain it fully here.

First, I'll answer the question that you formed with my opening statement.  "What is the most important finding?  It's Commitment for sales success.

Next, we'll set the stage.  We are talking about this issue in the context of an existing salesperson.  If the finding of Lack of Desire was for a salesperson who was failing, a client would say, "Well, that explains it."  Not really.  Their sales competencies and Sales DNA will explain lack of performance.  But the lack of Desire does tell us that the underachieving salesperson is unlikely to improve due to a lack of incentive to change.  However, when a top-performing salesperson lacks Desire, clients don't know what to make of it. They always wonder, "How could that be?"  Well, it's fairly simple how that could be.  In most cases, it's as simple as something must have changed.

I'll give you an example.  This week, I spent two days training a room full of experts from the sales training space.  These experts are some of the 150 or so who provide OMG's evaluations and assessments to clients.  This particular group was made up of veterans - sales experts who have been with OMG for as long as 25 years, so I can't really do sales or product training with this group.  Instead, we work on how they grow, improve, and get to the next level.  These sales experts are VERY successful, yet if we were to evaluate them, I'm certain that based on what I heard in the room this week, we would see Lack of Desire for most of them.

As a group, they were guilty of taking their foot off the gas.  They lost their edge.  Sure, they still generate a lot of business and are still successful, but the edge that got them there, the intensity that kept them there, and the fire that burned hot within them, was more like a pilot light these days.  My job then, was to reignite that fire while they were with me.

So this group presents a terrific example of top-performers who lack desire.  It simply means that the desire that got them there isn't there anymore, but it doesn't mean that they will no longer be successful.

One of the attendees at this week's training directed me to a video by ET, the hip-hop preacher.  This short video is a great example of what strong Desire truly is.  Check it out here, but you might want to skip the ad at the beginning.

When a candidate for a sales position lacks Desire, there are no questions.  Clients simply do not pursue candidates who lack either Desire or Commitment.  Why hire a new salesperson with that issue?

I hope that you better understand why Desire for success in sales:

  • is so crucial in a new salesperson;
  • explains why an underperforming salesperson will not improve; and
  • can so easily wane in a top-performing salesperson after years of success.

Can you personally feel how your own Desire for success in sales, sales management, sales leadership, or executive leadership has intensified or waned over the course of your career?

 

Image from Eric Thomas

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales training, omg, sales assessments, eric thomas, desire for success

Top 10 Reasons Why Your Great New Salesperson Might Fail

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jun 30, 2014 @ 09:06 AM

failure

When a great salesperson is recommended by Objective Management Group's (OMG) Sales Candidate Assessment, and this star has a great track record, and great references, should we expect this person to succeed?

Most executives do.

But even though salespeople will tell you that "If you can sell, you can sell anything", that statement is only true some of the time.  Here are some examples of salespeople who are successful in one environment, but usually fail in another:

  1. They were the best in their business at selling high-volume, low-cost products until they went to work for a value-based company and the "beat their best price" tactics were no longer available.
  2. They were the best at selling programs to procurement until they went to work for a company where the sale had to be made in the C-Suite where they were intimidated, unable to speak the language and unable to grasp the importance of strategy, profit and return.
  3. They were the best at selling components to OEM's until they went to work for a company where they had to sell conceptual services and were lost without a product to demonstrate.
  4. They were the best at finding and selling new accounts for a local company until they went to work for a national firm and had to do the same thing, in a brand new territory, working from their home.
  5. They were the best at selling 5-cent parts by the thousand until they went to work for a company where they had to sell 6-figure programs and choked over the amount of money they had to ask for.
  6. They were the best when they were managing, retaining and growing key accounts, and now that they work for a company where they must hunt for new business, they are sucking wind.
  7. They were on top of the pack when they sold services with a six-month sales cycle, but now that they work for a company selling a product in a very short sales cycle, nothing is getting closed.
  8. They were #1 at the last company, working under a hands-on sales manager who was a stickler for coaching and accountability, but the results just aren't there with the new company where they are reporting directly to the President who only responds to the proactive requests of his salespeople.
  9. There was nobody better at getting contracts signed when they sold the product that everyone buys and it was only a matter of who they would buy it from, but now that they are selling things that companies could either do themselves or not do at all, they can't overcome the ambivalence.
  10. They were at the top of the heap working for the large, well-known industry leader where prospects rolled out the red carpet and eagerly bought their products.  Now that they are working for a lesser known company, they aren't able to overcome the resistance that is always there now, but never there before.

Skills and experience are terrific, but track record is extremely misleading!

For example, if you go back and take another look at #4, this is where great salespeople, selling the exact same thing, can suddenly fail because they aren't able to succeed when working remotely from a sales manager who doesn't manage her salespeople very closely.

I reviewed OMG's data on a random set of 4,500 recent sales candidate assessments and only 12% were suitable for working remotely.  BUT…upon closer look, 12% was not representative of the findings for any one company!

Of the companies that required both a remote seller and had enough candidates to make up an appropriate sample size, the distribution of candidates suitable for working remotely ranged from 2% to 75%.  I thought that was rather strange and looked again, but with different filters.  I found that the variations in suitability had more to do with the company, and the difficulty level of the role, than anything else.  When the role was more difficult and their job postings reflected that difficulty, stronger candidates applied and were assessed.  When the role was less difficult and the job postings reflected it, all kinds of qualified and unqualified candidates applied and the assessments reflected that change in candidate quality.  For example, look at these 5 companies, their percentage of suitable candidates, and the difficulty level of the role:

Company Difficulty Level Suitable for Remote
 A  Considerable  75%
 B  Considerable  67%
 C  Some  50%
 D  Moderate  25%
 E  Moderate  2% 

If you throw out company E, the average is 60% suitable, but we also lose 75% of the candidates in the sample, so you can’t do that… 

When the role is not very difficult, the company will attract lower level salespeople, and they will be much less likely to be suitable for working remotely than their much stronger peers.

When you look at all 10 of my examples, you should be able to recognize why it is so important to use a sales-specific candidate assessment that is customized to your company's requirements, determines whether candidates possess the required selling skills, digs into the Sales DNA to determine whether candidates will succeed in your business, and in this role, and makes an accurate, predictive recommendation.

 

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Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales hiring, sales candidates, omg, sales assessment test, sales selection

Top 20 Reasons Why Data May Not be the Key to Boosting Sales

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Jun 11, 2014 @ 16:06 PM

DataI read somewhere that data was the key to boosting sales.  Really?  Says who?

When you look into the "who", it should come as no surprise that it's the companies that provide data analytics that say so.  Don't get me wrong; data (and especially the right data) can be very useful.  But data, by itself, doesn't boost anything.

If you are getting the right data...

  • where opportunities stall in your sales process,
  • why they stall,
  • conversion ratios from first contact to closing,
  • win rates by salesperson and opportunity type,
  • length of sales cycle by salesperson and opportunity type,
  • % of opportunities where there is true traction,
  • % of opportunities that are fully qualified,
  • % of opportunities that get demos, proposals, quotes,

...and you know what to look for, you can discover what and/or who needs to be fixed.  But you still have to fix it.  The data won't do that for you.  And you need to know more than what and who.  You must know why.  And the why could be different for each and every salesperson.

Data can help you identify bottlenecks, trends and problems.  The importance of those cannot be understated.  However, can you actually fix the problem once you know what it is?

For example, one of the common trends, being illuminated by data, is the dropping win rate.  So you know you aren't closing enough business to hit plan.  Why is the win rate so low?

It could be:

  1. Poor sales selection,
  2. Ineffective sales coaching,
  3. Lack of accountability,
  4. Unqualified proposals or quotes,
  5. Unqualified demos,
  6. Inconsistent messaging,
  7. Lack of onboarding,
  8. Skill gap,
  9. Poor consultative selling skills,
  10. Lack of listening and questioning skills,
  11. Lack of effort,
  12. Follow-up,
  13. Pricing,
  14. Inability to sell value,
  15. Rushing through the sales process,
  16. Ineffective sales process,
  17. Poor sales DNA,
  18. Poor closing skills,
  19. Lack of relationships, and/or
  20. Failure to reach decision makers.
Hint:  It's probably not #18 - poor closing skills.  Closing skills aren't required when the earlier stages of the sales process are effectively executed.  The only time when closing skills should come into play is when a properly qualified, closable prospect isn't able to make a decision at closing time.  
Of course there are many, many more possibilities, but these are simply the first 20 that come to mind!  And in case you forgot, these were some of the reasons as to why the win rate is so low.
After you have identified the reason(s), then you must determine how to fix the problem.  If it's simply a single issue, coaching is probably the best course of action, but the salesperson must be coachable and you must be better at this particular issue than your salesperson.  If it's multiple issues affecting multiple salespeople, then training is a better way to go.
The fastest and easiest way to identify all of the issues on your sales force is to have your sales force evaluated.  You can learn more about that by watching this 2-minute video:

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Topics: Dave Kurlan, omg, evaluate the sales force, objective management group

Your Next Sales Candidate: Looking for "The One"

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Mar 05, 2014 @ 08:03 AM

the oneA couple of questions from the mail bag concerned finding that special someone; you know, "The One."

In the first case, the client had hired a few salespeople who didn't work out and wanted to know if Objective Management Group's (OMG) Sales Candidate Assessment was capable of identifying and recommending what they were calling a crusader.  They believe that their business is different because people don't know that they need what this particular company is selling.

Their business is different - a little - from most businesses, but certainly not unique by any definition.  Most companies sell products and services to a saturated market - companies and consumers that already buy "stuff" like that and the only thing a customer or prospect must determine is which company they will buy from this time.  A great example of this is your copier lease.  At or before lease expiration, you will lease one or more new machines and the only decision that you might need to make could be to which brand, company or salesperson you will give the business.

There are also products and services that aren't automatically purchased, with any regularity or certainty, by anyone.  Budgets may not exist, they don't appear as line items, and it's quite possible that nobody has ever given it a thought.  In most cases, when we recommend evaluating a sales force as a way to provide an executive the answers he needs to explain why performance isn't where it needs to be and make the decisions to get the organization performing at a higher level, it's the first time that executive had ever given thought to a sales force evaluation.  In this case, it's not "Who do we buy from?", it's "Do we buy?", a completely different kind of sale.  But like I said before, it's certainly not unique.

So this company wanted a crusader, something OMG calls an evangelizer.  That the company had little success before was only partly due to not having properly set its selection criteria.  The other issue with small companies like this is that very frequently, they are not set-up in such a way that will support the hiring of new salespeople.  Many small companies do not have sales managers, leaving the Presidents, CEO's and owners serving in that role on-demand.  New salespeople require knowledge, onboarding, training, coaching, direction, training, coaching, support, training, coaching, accountability and attention.  (I know that there are 3 instances of training and coaching.)  When sales management is provided only as required, new salespeople will take 3 times longer to ramp-up (now do you understand the importance of the 3 instances of coaching and training?)  If they even survive that long.

The other mail bag question was from a Sales VP who had his final 3 candidates lined up.  They had already completed comprehensive online applications, taken OMG's Sales Candidate Assessment and were recommended, had been interviewed by phone and again via video conference by me, and had been interviewed via video conference a second time by the VP and Sales Director.  Their final criteria for selection was about finding "the one."  I told them that "the one' should never be the goal…nobody ever lives up to that label.  After putting a candidate through all of those steps in the process, you already know they have the capabiity to succeed in this sales role.  The final step is when it's finally OK to choose someone you like.   You should also be favoring someone who really gets what you do – who understands how to hunt for and create applications, relentlessly drives the sales process, and will get up to speed quickly.  "The one" is probably earning $250,000 or more selling something more conceptual to CEO's…

You can get sales selection right, but it takes the right process, tools, interviewing skills, and selection criteria.  As with the sales process, you can't skip steps, take anything for granted, or be too casual about your role in any part of the process.

I'll be talking more about selection criteria when I speak at The EcSell Institute Sales Coaching Summit in Charlotte on April 15.  Their Summit is always a terrific program and if you're available, you would benefit from attending.

We'll also be talking about sales selection when I host part 2 of Leading the Ideal Sales Force on March 12 at 11 AM ET.  We'll discuss the following 3 topics:

Blindspots - When Salespeople Finally Have Better Conversations
Blindspots - Fighting for The Candidate You Love
Blindspots - We Finally Have a Working Pipeline

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales hiring, sales candidates, omg, sales selection, sales assessments

What Percentage of Sales Candidates are Worthy of Being Hired?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jan 13, 2014 @ 06:01 AM

worthyIt’s an interesting question and one that has more than one answer.  I wrote an article back in September of 2013 that asked the question, Are Sales and Sales Management Candidates Getting Worse?

Consider the way that most companies hire people for sales roles.  They skim through resumes, select only those that have the experience they look for, do some preliminary phone interviewing, and bring in the best for a series of face-to-face interviews.  They may eventually hire 50% of the candidates they interviewed, a group of finalists that represented 75% of the phone interview group, who represented perhaps a third of the resumes collected.  Do the math, and you’ll see that the typical company hires about 37% of the candidates they originally identified as worthy.

Now consider that on average, about half of those new salespeople fail, and half of the successful group fails to meet quota.  Why are companies still getting sales hiring so wrong?

It begins with the skimming of resumes.  This practice causes many of the wrong people to be included in the candidate pool.  They have nice resumes, have the right background, and may even interview well.  But most of these candidates have little in the way of selling capabilities.  According to Objective Management Group’s (OMG) statistics from more than 700,000 sales evaluations, 74% of all salespeople suck.

When OMG’s Sales Candidate assessment is used as a substitute for skimming through resumes, the process is similar.

Each candidate is assessed – before anything else is done.  Depending on the difficulty of the role, and the requirements of the position, and the customization of the assessment, we can expect anywhere from 87% (for the most challenging roles) to 57% (the least challenging roles) of all candidates to be disqualified based on whether or not their selling capabilities meet the requirements for the role.  By the way, that averages out to 72%, which is extremely close to the 74% that you know aren’t very capable.  See the detailed chart below.

So now, we have anywhere from 13% to 43% of our original candidate pool to work with.  As in the first example, those candidates are phoned and the best of those candidates are interviewed.  Finally, the best of the best are hired.  The difference with this example is that better than 90% of the salespeople in this group succeed!

I’ll be leading a Webinar on February 26, at 11 AM Eastern, that walks existing OMG clients through our Candidate Analyzer – a web tool for sorting and filtering their candidates that have already been assessed.  You’re welcome to join us and see what all the fuss is…

Register here.

2013 Candidates Recommended by Role and Difficulty  

 Percentages

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales hiring, sales candidates, omg, sales selection, sales assessments, statistics

Sales Candidate Shortage - More Proof That Sales Isn't Dead Yet

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Nov 07, 2013 @ 06:11 AM

Death Of SellingAs you probably know, many people have been writing premature obituaries about the impending death of selling.  Of course, that's been going on since at least 2006 when I posted my first rebuttal to this silly claim, and as recently as last month when I posted my latest rebuttal.  It's being perpetuated by extremist marketers who are claiming that inbound will become the be-all end-all.  

It's simply not true.

The latest proof can be found in this July 2013 USA Today article.  I'll give you the important facts, but you should shoot over there and read the entire article.

The article said that in June, "the number of jobs in sales and related occupations jumped a whopping 445,000 to a four-year-high of 15.8 million."  That's in the USA alone.  Those numbers are trending the wrong way for the pro-death-of-selling folks.  Not only that, our company, Objective Management Group, will need to change it's BHAG from 14 million to 16 million salespeople evaluated! 

The article also said that "Thirty-five percent of sales managers couldn't find qualified candidates for open positions."  That's consistent with what clients have been seeing.  

Another important point from the article was that it is now taking three months to fill a sales position.  I should add that that's when standard quality sales managers look for standard quality salespeople.  If we raise the bar and look for high quality salespeople, the timeline can extend to six months!

These developments place an even bigger emphasis on the importance of using a best-in-class, sales-specific, accurate and predictive sales candidate assessment early in your sales recruiting process.  When there is urgency to fill positions and most of the candidates aren't very good, even your hiring managers will have to deal with the case of happy ears.  Consistent use of the assessment will alleviate that.

While this is all disappointing and frustrating news for companies that need to hire salespeople, and especially for those who want to hire great salespeople, it's really bad news for the people who have been holding those messed-up crystal balls!

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales hiring, Inbound Marketing, sales candidates, omg, sales recruiting sales assessments, death of selling

Can Your Existing Sales Force Generate More Revenue?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Aug 01, 2013 @ 09:08 AM

dollar signOne of the questions, that I often field from clients who have had their sales forces evaluated, is, "Can you please explain the opportunity finding?"

In our Sales Force Evaluation, the Opportunity is our projection of how much additional revenue the sales force can generate.

This 1:45 minute video explains how we calculate the number.  If you have any questions or want to know whether we can calculate something similar for your sales force, drop me a line!

 

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales management, sales leadership, omg, increase sales

Personality Tests, Sales Candidate Selection - How Tests Measure Up

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jun 17, 2013 @ 08:06 AM

sales assessmentA recent article in Columbus Business First discussed background checks and use of personality tests.  The most important line in the article read, "Personality often is the best insight into whether a person is a good cultural fit for a specific company."

Notice that they didn't say that personality is the best insight into whether a person will succeed in sales.  That's because it isn't.  Never was.  Never will be.

Despite that, article after article points to the advantage of personality tests as a sales pre-employment tool.  And most personality assessments now claim to be able to help you eliminate sales hiring mistakes too.  The reality though is that almost every available "sales assessment" is a marketing-modified version of a personality assessment.  By marketing-modified, I mean that the actual findings are the exact same findings you will see on their standard personality test, but the names or labels of the findings have been modified to sound as if they are sales findings.  As with costumes, you only need to take off the mask and you'll see what's underneath.  No exceptions.  No apologies.

Personality tests aren't predictive either.  Oh, they say that they are?  Then why is their validation of choice "construct validity" rather than "predictive validity"?

There is only one original, sales-specific assessment that collects, measures, and provides true sales findings and its predictive validity is incomparable.  Objective Management Group (OMG) has been perfecting sales selection for 23 years and you can't beat these two statistics:

  • 75% of Candidates, who are not recommended but get hired anyway, fail within 6 months.
     
  • 92% of Candidates, who are recommended and hired, rise to the top half of their sales forces within 12 months.

Are you using the right assessment?

The right assessment is only part of the solution to developing consistency with your sales hiring and selection.  You also need a best-practices, sales recruiting process.  You can see how your existing process rates by using our free tool, the Sales Recruiting Process Grader.

And of course, sales management plays a part in your hiring process too.  They're responsible for on-boarding, messaging, coaching, accountability, direction, guidance and support.  If they don't perform any one or more of those functions effectively, even a strong salesperson can fail.

Finally, no process is stronger than its weakest link.  In the sales recruiting process, that weakness could be your job posting.  Most companies get that part completely wrong, attracting the wrong salespeople into the candidate pool and if you don't have the right candidates in the pool, the process, assessment and sales management become non-factors.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales candidates, omg, Personality Tests, sales aptitude tests, sales tests, sales assessment tests, sales assessments

The Latest and Greatest in Sales Force Effectiveness

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Tue, Apr 23, 2013 @ 21:04 PM

Spoiler Warning:  This article is about my company and its new product.  Stick around though and I think you'll realize that it's just as much about your company as it is mine.

One of the proudest moments of my professional career occurred Sunday, April 21, 2013, when my team at Objective Management Group (OMG) introduced our brand new Sales Force Evaluation product to 120 OMG Partners from around the world.  That we were in Boston, just one day after the second bombing suspect was captured, made it even more incredible!

OMG's New Sales Force Evaluation Tool Introduced on April 21, 2013

Partners getting their first look and using their phones to vote their approval.

OMG's New Sales Force Evaluation Tool Introduced April 21, 2013

We have introduced our share of evaluation and assessment tools during the past 23 years, but this introduction was completely different.  My team worked tirelessly for nearly an entire year on our latest gem and our Partners received it, with even more enthusiasm than we felt, when we completed the project just 48 hours earlier.

Why all the excitement?

Forget for just a minute how incredibly impressive the product looks.  It's the information that sets it apart from, well, even our previous sales force evaluation product, which was already the best on the planet.  Of the many differences between our new and old products, the one I like the most is this one:  While our old product was findings-centric; the new product is answer-centric.  Why should you care about any of this?

Our Sales Effectiveness and Improvement Analysis answers 4 critical questions about your company:

  • Can our sales force be more effective?
  • How much more effective can we be?
  • What will it take to accomplish that?
  • How long will it take to accomplish that?

If you don't care about the answers to those 4 questions, then you must have already cashed out or retired.

In order to answer those 4 questions, we answer these additional 19 questions along the way: 

  • How Does Sales Leadership Impact Our Sales Force?
  • What Are Our Current Sales Capabilities?  (here is an image of the summary page of this chapter)
OMG Sales Force Evaluation
  • How Motivated Are Our Salespeople and How Are They Motivated?
  • Can We Generate More New Business?
  • Can We Be Better at Reaching Actual Decision Makers?
  • Can We Shorten Our Sales Cycle? 
  • Can We Sell More Consultatively? 
  • Are We Selling on Price and Who Can Become a Value Seller? 
  • Is Our Value Proposition Consistent? 
  • Can We Close More Sales? 
  • Do Our Systems and Processes Support a High Performance Sales Organization?
  • Can We Be More Consistent with Our Sales Process? 
  • How Well Are Our Sales Leadership Strategies Aligned? 
  • Do We Need to Change Our Selection Criteria?
  • Can We Improve Ramp-Up?
  • Can We Improve Our Pipeline and Forecasting Accuracy?
  • Can We Improve Our Sales Culture?
  • Who Can Become More Effective in Their Roles?
  • What Are the Short-term Priorities for Accelerated Growth?
Each thoughtful explanation is supported by plentiful data points.  It's all about the science and if our science can explain the sales performance taking place at your company and how you can improve it, you would have to be an overconfident know-it-all not to be excited about this turn of events.
 
Speaking of science, if you weren't already following me and OMG, our highly accurate and predictive sales specific tools are legendary.  Our "old" tool won the Gold Medal for Top Sales Assessment Tool in 2011 and 2012.  Our sales-specific evaluations and assessments have been used to evaluate and assess more than 1831615 salespeople and sales leaders in more than 10,000 companies.
 
 
If you would like to get in line and explore whether it makes sense to have your sales force evaluated in the 2nd quarter, click here and I'll have the appropriate partner follow-up with you.
 
 
Thanks for reading today - I appreciate it.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales improvement, omg, best sales assessment, top sales assessment, sales development tool

Latest Research on Personality Assessments for Sales Selection

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Apr 15, 2013 @ 10:04 AM

ambivertTwo articles caught my attention today.

The first, 10 Traits of Successful Salespeople, was typical of the misinformation that often passes for must-read information:

  • The data came from commission-only insurance salespeople in just one company, so it has limited application in other industries.  
  • The author says that some of the most successful salespeople share 10 personality traits, but doesn't say how many were in the study or how many shared the 10 traits!
  • Because all of the salespeople worked for the same company, they reported to that one company's sales management team, further skewing the results.
  • The author incorrectly classified the 10 traits as personality traits, but some of them are actually behavioral styles.  When styles and traits are combined, they become qualities.
  • Using Objective Management Group's (OMG) data on salespeople for reference, we know that just as many unsuccessful salespeople share those 10 qualities as successful salespeople.  That's why only some and not most of the successful people shared the traits!
  • Even when salespeople possess all 10 qualities, there are still dozens of reasons why they still may not succeed.  OMG identifies weaknesses on its Sales Candidate Assessments that predict why someone who has all the greatest personality traits could be expected to fail.   OMG's top 4 are:
    • Lack of Commitment toward sales success;
    • Lack of Desire for sales success (different from Drive in that Desire in this context is sales specific);
    • Poor Outlook; 
    • Excuse Making.  A sales candidate with either the Lack of Desire or the Lack of Commitment would neutralize all 10 traits the article referred to!
  • OMG's next 7 would be: 
    • Non-Supportive Buy Cycle (the way the candidate buys does not support the sales cycle); 
    • Need for Approval (their need to be liked outweighs their need to sell); 
    • Discomfort Talking about Money; 
    • Becoming Emotional; 
    • Difficulty Recovering from Rejection;
    • Too Trusting;
    • Self-Limiting Beliefs.  

Any combination of 3 or more would certainly neutralize all 10 of the traits referred to in the article.

The second article appeared on the same site and was called Busting the Personality Myth about Salespeople.  This article is not as far off the path as the first article, but it's still full of misinformation.  It's claim, that ambiverts are more successful than extroverts and introverts, may be or may not be true.  There were only 300 salespeople in the study and data was collected for only a 3 month period.  We weren't told what they were selling, who they were selling it to, what the cost was, or the type of competition they faced.  Even if the data is sound,  you would not be smart to go recruit and select ambiverts!  I guarantee that 74% of them will suck at sales too!

It is becoming more and more difficult to separate opinions, experiences and musings from appropriately collected, time-tested, sales-specific, trans-industry data.  That's probably why OMG has earned the Gold Medal for Top Sales Assessment Tool from TopSalesWorld for two years running.

For more on the differences between Assessments and which ones are the most predictive, see this series of articles.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales candidates, omg, hiring salespeople, Personality Tests, personality assessments, sales assessment tests, sales selection, sales assessments, objective management group

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Best-Selling Author, Keynote Speaker and Sales Thought Leader.  Dave Kurlan's Understanding the Sales Force Blog earned a medal for the Top Sales & Marketing Blog award for six consecutive years. This article earned a Bronze Medal for Top Sales Blog post in 2016, this one earned a Silver medal for 2017, and this article earned Silver for 2018. Read more about Dave.

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Leaading Sales Consultants 2018

Top Sales Awards 2018 - Individual Blog -  Silver

Top Sales Awards 2018 - Article/Post -  Silver


Top Sales Awards 2018 - Assessment Tool -  Gold

 2016 Top Sales & Marketing Individual Blog - Bronze

Top Sales & Marketing Awards 2015 -  Bronze - Thought Leader

2016 Top Sales & Marketing Podcast - Gold

2016 Top Sales & Marketing Webinar - Gold

Top Sales & Marketing Awards 2015 - Bronze - eBook/White Paper

Top 50 Sales & Marketing Blog 2019

Dave Kurlan Top 50 Sales Influencer 2015

Sales Pro Insider Blog

Top 50 most innovative sales bloggers

Top100Strategic

Top100SalesInfluencersOnTwitter



Hubspot Top 25 Blogs

 

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