What it Takes to be an Elite (Top 7%) Salesperson

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Tue, Oct 11, 2016 @ 06:10 AM

best.png

Last week I received a call from a young, motivated salesperson - we'll call him Jim - who desperately wanted to be one of the elite 7% of all salespeople.  Despite being just 26 years old, he believed that he was already in the top 7%.  During our call, he asked me a great question.  He asked, "How many of the top 7% have you actually met and where are they today?"  I didn't have to think very long or hard to answer that question because it was one of the easiest questions I have ever been asked.

Most companies have mediocre salespeople and a small percentage - less than 10% - are strong.  But there is an exception.  Many of the greatest salespeople, following a necessary stint in sales leadership, become sales consultants.  Now you are probably familiar with the sales consultants who have best-selling books or who tweet and blog on social media.  But they aren't the only sales consultants and trainers by a long shot.  There are thousands more and some of them are really good at what they do.  The best and brightest of them partner with my company, Objective Management Group (OMG), and provide our award winning sales candidate assessments and sales force evaluations to their clients.  Without a doubt, the nearly 300 individuals that represent OMG around the world, are the single biggest collection of the top 7% anywhere.  And each year, when around 150 of them gather for our international sales experts conference, that is where you will find the single biggest gathering of elite salespeople.

Why did Jim ask how many of these top performers I had met?  Because to him, the top 7% are the celebrities of sales.  It's like asking someone if they have met any professional athletes, movie or TV stars, or Presidents.  He has the top 7% on a pedestal because he wants to be one.

The bigger question for me is why Jim?  Why aren't the other 93% of the sales population calling, writing and asking how they can become part of the top 7%?  Why isn't it more important to them?  

Part of the answer should be so, so obvious.  If it was more important to them they would already be part of the top 7%, certainly part of the next 16% and not one of the bottom 77%!

Much of this problem boils down to Commitment to success in sales.

  • All salespeople score, on average, only 59% for Commitment.
  • The top 7% (Sales Quotient over 139) average, 72%.
  • Strong salespeople (Sales Quotient between 130-139) Score, on average, 65%
  • Serviceable salespeople (Sales Quotient between 115-129) 60% - or borderline Commitment.
  • Weak salespeople (Sales Quotient between 91-115 and the largest group) score, on average 45%
  • The bottom 10% (Sales Quotient under 91) score, on average, 39%

Notice that the biggest drop-off (from 60% to 45%) occurs when you drop from serviceable to weak.

If I had to guess, Jim's commitment is consistent with the elite group.  And while the top group has the highest overall scores for Commitment, it doesn't necessarily hold true that if a salesperson has a high commitment score that they are or will become part of that group.  Commitment is only 1 of 250 data points and while it is the most important, it is only 1.  For example, a salesperson with strong commitment, but a low score for Desire for success in sales, Motivation, Excuse Making, or even Coachable, is less likely to make it to the top group.  

OMG measures 21 Sales Core Competenceis and while I have mentioned 4 in this article, there are 17 others that will also have a great impact on whether a salesperson can make it to the top.  While 10 of those competenices are Tactical Selling competencies, 6 of them represent Sales DNA.  The top 7% have Sales DNA greater than 82% while weak Salespeople score 60% and the bottom 10% only 54%.  Sales DNA is a huge contributor to sales success and the lower the score on Commitment, the less likely it is that one could overcome a low Sales DNA.

Of course, when it comes to hiring salespeople, there is only one tool that can accurately predict whether you have an elite candidate, a strong candidate, or one of the others.

And if you were an elite salesperson, have put in your time in sales leadership, and are ready to bring OMG's great tools to your clients, you can learn more here.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales motivation, sales excellence, sales commitment, Sales Experts, elite salespeople

What is the Single Biggest Differentiator Between Top and Bottom Salespeople?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Oct 03, 2016 @ 06:10 AM

seths.head.png

Thanks for continuing to read my Blog - I appreciate it.  There is one Blog that I never fail to read, and that's Seth Godin's Blog.  Seth doesn't write about sales - he pens a thought leadership Blog - but sometimes his articles are very applicable to sales and selling.  Recently, he posted two very short articles - each is less than 30 seconds to read and I believe they are both well worth your time.

The first is Fully Baked.  The second, on a related topic, is Skills vs. Talents

Over the years, I have seen first hand that one of the major differences between great and mediocre salespeople is that great salespeople want to improve - they made themselves great - and mediocre salespeople aren't willing to make the changes to become more effective.  Great salespeople strive for mastery while underachievers don't.  Back in the 1950's Albert Gray said something along the lines of, "Sales winners do the things they don't want to do and the others don't."

All professions have their small percentage of practitioners who aren't very good, but can you imagine the impact we would experience if attorneys, accountants or engineers underperformed to the same degree as nearly half of the sales population?

You can see evidence of that in this article where the data shows that the best salespeople have twice the level of commitment to achieving greater sales success than their underachieving counterparts.  You read that correctly - that's twice as committed!

All salespeople can develop the skills to achieve greater sales success, but only those who are committed enough to make changes can overcome Sales DNA that doesn't support the execution of those skills.  Even so, most salespeople fail to learn even the skills necessary for sales effectiveness in 2016.  And improving their Sales DNA?  Most salespeople have never even heard the phrase and aren't aware that their sales DNA needs to be improved.  We know you can't fix stupid, but how do you fix uninformed?

Topics: Dave Kurlan, Sales DNA, sales excellence, sales commitment, Seth Godin

What Committed Salespeople Do Differently

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 13:04 PM

Commitment_Continuum_arrow_w_title

Commitment Continuum is a trademark of the Jansen Sports Leadership Center and the image is from their website.

This week we found ourselves sitting in camp chairs, bundled up in warm coats, wearing winter gloves and covered in blankets, to watch our son play on his Middle School baseball team.  The only thing this team could win is the Bad News Bears Look-Alike Contest.  He also plays on a very talented travel team, so this school game was not only awful to watch, it was doubly awful because of the winter weather.  Yes, there was snow in the air.  We will attend nearly every single 1 of the 100 games he will play for 5 teams this year.  Many people would say that...

  • We aren't required to go (some parents drop-off.)
  • He doesn't ask us to watch (he's very independent.)
  • We don't have to attend as many as we do (half would be more than most parents.)
  • It is rarely convenient (some games are at 3:30 PM.)
  • Games are rarely played in beautiful weather (too hot in July and August, too cold in April, and too wet or humid the rest of the time).
  • There is rarely comfortable seating (thus the not quite as uncomfortable camp chairs).
  • There are other things we need to do.
  • Double Headers on Saturdays and Sundays take up most of the weekend.
  • School games and Little League games on the same day take up most of the afternoon and evening.
  • It's baseball - a slow, boring game for those who don't know the game within the game.

So why do we do this?

Commitment.  We have discussed commitment a LOT in this Blog recently because many people misunderstand the role it plays in successful selling.  Read any of these articles for more on commitment.

So let me help.  We are committed to doing whatever it takes to give our son whatever he needs in order to thrive.  With his talent in this sport, baseball is one of the opportunities we provide him with and doing whatever it takes to watch him play is one of the unconditional commitments we make.  Speaking of baseball, check out these new visual statistics being provided by MLB.  Does it get you thinking about the additional things you could measure in sales?  How about the additional things that we can measure?

In sales, most salespeople, especially the bottom 74%, don't do whatever it takes to succeed.  For example, if the company, quota, expectations and goals were your child, and you had similar values for your son or daughter, would you:

  • Postpone filling your pipeline?
  • Give up when you finally get a decision-maker on the phone because the prospect is too difficult to convert?
  • Not advocate for yourself when faced with tough competition, a tougher prospect, or objections?
  • Not thoroughly qualify an opportunity the way you would qualify the friends your son or daughter hangs out with or a trip they might take?
  • Not challenge a prospect when their thinking or strategy isn't quite what it could or should be?
  • Not talk about money because it's uncomfortable?
  • Not point out, defend and brag about the value the way you would brag about your children?
  • Not do whatever it takes to get a closable opportunity closed?

But that is exactly what the majority of salespeople are doing.  They half-sell.  They aren't thorough, or effective, or efficient, or memorable, or resilient, or tenacious, or assertive, because they aren't comfortable doing those things.  Because they don't equate those things as being the business equivalent of their own children, for whom they would do whatever it takes.  Especially if it's uncomfortable.  Whatever it takes. That's what commitment is.  It's not work ethic-silly.   Anyone can put in long hours.  It's about doing all of the necessary things despite being uncomfortable.  Whatever it takes.  I found the trademarked image at the top of this article from Jansen Sports Leadership Center.

Jonathan Farrington interviewed me for the cover feature in this week's edition of Top Sales Magazine.   The topic is the importance of getting sales selection right.

Coincidentally, the latest edition of Top Sales Academy is also out this week with me presenting, How  to Coach Salespeople Like a Pro and it's free, available on demand, and really useful.  Are you a committed sales leader or sales manager?   One of the things you must do is get better at coaching.  So what are you waiting for?

 

 

 

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales commitment, Baseball, sales success

The Importance of Resiliency in Sales and Selling

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Apr 22, 2015 @ 06:04 AM

paul-blart-mall-cop-2

We saw Paul Blart - Mall Cop 2 and laughed a grand total of twice.  It was inept comedy, a horrible sequel and a terrible movie.  Despite that, it was a great example of resiliency as Blart is continually rejected, stopped, ridiculed and put-off, only to ignore those events, bear down and try even harder to accomplish his goals.  From that perspective, the movie, and Kevin James, succeed at demonstrating what it is like to be a salesperson.  Every other employee in a company is provided with a job description, a set of goals or expectations, training if necessary, and then left to do their job.  Nobody will stop them or make it difficult for them to complete their work, as long as they are capable.  Salespeople, on the other hand, must deal with prospects who won't answer their phones or emails, competitors who say bad things about them and their companies, as well as products and services that aren't always the best in quality, value, or the best choice.  Salespeople must demonstrate resiliency in order to succeed, yet one of the components of resiliency is sorely lacking in today's modern salespeople.

Only 34% of all salespeople have strong commitment for success in  sales - down considerably from 58% in 2007. Why?  One reason is that selling is more difficult than it was 10 years ago.  Another reason could be the rapid growth of inside sales teams where, unlike the traditional quota-carrying outside salesperson of years past, members of the inside sales team are often younger, less experienced, and not necessarily committed to a career of sales excellence.

Movies have been a great source of inspiration for me.  In addition to utilizing close to 100 different movie clips to demonstrate various selling and sales management lessons during training, a quick search revealed that I have relied on various movies to offer an analogy in more than a dozen Blog articles over the past 10 years.  Among them are lessons from:

We Bought a Zoo 
Dragnet 
Moneyball 
The Pursuit of Happyness 
The Lion King 
The Peaceful Warrior Movie 
Anti-Trust 
Gravity 
The Secret 
First Knight 
The Blind Side 
Coach Carter 

There are lessons everywhere.  All you have to do is look for them.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales, Sales DNA, sales commitment, movies and sales

What the Sales World Can Learn from Marathon Participants

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Apr 23, 2014 @ 16:04 PM

marathonEarlier this week, the world was once again focused on the city of Boston and the 118th running of the Boston Marathon.  I don’t run, but I know several people who do and the preparation for running this, or any other marathon, is daunting.

This isn’t an event that one can take lightly.  Consider the length of time that a runner must train to prepare for running a 26.2-mile race.  It takes up to 20 weeks to prepare for a marathon, while gradually building strength and endurance.  It includes several shorter weekday runs as well as a long-distance run of anywhere from 12-15 miles one day over the weekend.  Someone training for a marathon should run up to 50 miles per week.  It takes an enormous commitment – to a hobby!

While some professional runners enter a marathon, more than 30,000 people were simply participating because they could.  These participants have full-time jobs, careers and businesses.  This is a hobby.  Yet their commitment to this hobby should be embarrassing to most salespeople, who don’t put forth anywhere near this level of commitment, effort, time or practice into their own career!

If you’ve been reading my blog for the past 8 years and 1,150 articles, then you have no doubt read that salespeople can be categorized into 3 groups.  According to the data amassed by Objective Management Group’s (OMG) assessments of salespeople:

  • There is an elite group of salespeople, but it represents only 6% of the sales population.
  • An additional 20% of the sales population is good, but not great.
  • There is a bottom 74% and, for the most part, they suck equally.

This contradicts the traditional thinking that the bell curve has a top 20%, middle 60% and bottom 20%. 

So, perhaps our top 6% is the group who takes selling as seriously as those runners who train for a marathon.  But the question is, why only 6%?  Why not everyone else?

To answer that question, we need to better understand the differences between selling and other professions.  If you forecast a sale and it goes to a competitor, management says, “Too bad.”  Losing is OK.  But even an attorney who loses a case gets paid to lose…

If you’re a structural engineer and you screw up…if you’re a cop and you shoot an innocent victim...if you’re a bus driver, train conductor, airline pilot, or ship’s captain and you hit something…if you’re in manufacturing and you turn out defective products…if you’re a safety inspector and you “pass” a product that fails…

Most professions have no tolerance for failure.  In sales, because it’s not just possible, but likely that salespeople will fail, most companies have sales cultures of mediocrity, making it a virtual certainty that underperforming salespeople will continue on that track.

If underperformance is acceptable, then why would anyone, other than the most committed salespeople, put in the effort and time that a marathon runner would?

Can we change this? 

Not until we stamp out mediocrity.  That won’t happen until we raise the bar on sales management.  Only 8% of all sales managers make up the elite level and only a total of 18% are competent at sales management and coaching.  With 82% bordering on sales management incompetence, it’s no wonder that we can’t make improvements to the levels of commitment, effort, time, practice and effectiveness of most salespeople.

I’m one voice, but if you’re as disturbed by all of this as I am, perhaps you’ll share this with all of the CEO’s, Presidents, Sales VP’s and Directors, Sales Managers and salespeople in your circle.  Ask them what they have observed.  Ask them what they think.  Ask if they see the need to change something, anything, anytime soon.  And chime in with your own comments about this question – can we change this?

As long as we’re talking about the quest for sales excellence, check out Jack Daly’s new book, Hyper Sales Growth.  In his Weekly Insights Newsletter, Verne Harnish, the Growth Guy, wrote, "It's finally here! The book all the millions of fans (that's literal) of Jack Daly have been wanting -- a book that shares the same time-tested sales management techniques that work to drive the growth he's been teaching in his powerful and packed workshops. It's all about getting the sales management piece right - and this is the book that shows you the way."  

I don't know about you, but there just isn't enough good sales management guidance, and with only a handful of us devoting our blogs to it, a book from someone like Jack will be quite helpful.  To take a line from the old Smucker's jelly tagline, "...it's just got to be good."

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales training, sales excellence, sales commitment, jacky daly, hyper sales excellence

Consultative Selling, Commitment and Training - Like Oil & Water

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Fri, Mar 14, 2014 @ 05:03 AM

commitmentFirst the links:

The Huffington Post and the Hubspot Blog both published an article, by Dan Lyons about OMG and Kurlan and what it takes to succeed in sales.

This article was named Top Sales Article for last week and this article was named a Top 10 Sales Article for last week, both over at Top Sales World.  While you are there, check out the contest for Top Salesperson - perhaps you can nominate someone who works for you.

We recently evaluated a sales force where the salespeople had, on average, only 18% of the attributes of a consultative seller.

"How could that be?", asked the Director of Sales.  "Achieve Global has come in 3 times in 3 years to teach consultative selling!"

That could be the punchline, but it's not.

So, why didn't the training on consultative selling stick?  There are reasons aplenty!

1. Salespeople with a low Figure-it-Out Factor (FIOF) don't pick things up very quickly.  That same finding is used to determine how quickly a new salesperson will ramp up and apply what they learned from training.  A score of 75 or better (out of 100) is representative of a salesperson who will quickly, well, figure things out.  Their average score for 18 salespeople was 46.

2. When you provide sales training, it's not just new skills that you ask people to learn.  You're asking them to change how they sell, so in essence, you're asking them to change who they are as salespeople.  Salespeople with a lack of Commitment don't have the incentive to change.  They are conditionally committed.  They will do what it takes - up to a point - as long as it's not too difficult, as long as it's not to scary, and as long as they agree with what you want them to do.  If you want them to change, and they don't agree that it's necessary or that these new skills are important for their success, nothing changes.  I write so much about sales Commitment that a Google search for my articles with commitment turned up 33,500 results!  Just remember, attempting to train salespeople who lack commitment is like combining oil and water.  Attend the EcSell Sales Coaching Summit on April 15 in Charlotte NC!  I'll be speaking on this very subject of Commitment.  It's a great conference and well worth the investment!  

3. You simply can't train salespeople to sell consultatively in a 1, 2 or 3-day training.  Our experience suggests that rather than overwhelm them with the fire hose and go away, it works much more effectively to spoon-feed them with a one-hour live, interactive, internet-based approach over 8 months.  Consultative selling is not what most people think it is.  Most salespeople think that you prepare some questions, ask the questions, and when you hear a problem, you provide a solution.  Not really.  9,770 results come up for my articles on Consultative Selling.  Most importantly, it's a conversation, not a series of questions.  It's a conversation that's different from what most salespeople are having with their prospects and it relies heavily on effective listening and note-taking skills.  Sure, questions play a big part, but if listening and note-taking suck, so do the follow-up questions.  Since this is different from what most salespeople have done their entire lives, these types of selling conversations must be demonstrated, through role-plays, time and again, covering all the possibilities and applications, until salespeople finally get the conversation in their heads.  You can't learn consultative selling any other way.

4. In between training sessions, salespeople must be coached on consultative selling by their sales manager.  In the case of this sales force, sales managers were spending only 12% of their time on coaching and it didn't include coaching to reinforce, develop or improve consultative selling skills.  The sales managers didn't really know how to sell consultatively either!

5. In order to effectively apply a Consultative Selling approach, salespeople must have the strengths to support having a conversation like this.  When the particular strengths do not appear in a salesperson's sales DNA, they become weaknesses.  Need for Approval (need to be liked) and Becoming Emotional (talking to yourself) are huge problems for consultative sellers.

This story appears here because it is fresh in my mind, not because it is in any way unique.  Company after company and sales force after sales force believe they are taking a consultative approach when, in reality, nothing could be further from the truth.

Speaking of truth, that's all you need to significantly increase sales.  Revealing the truth about your sales force's true capabilities and future possibilities is all it takes to begin fixing things, coaching them up and growing the revenue.  You should try it! 

Attend the EcSell Sales Coaching Summit on April 15 in Charlotte NC!  I'll be speaking on this very subject of Commitment. It's a great conference and well worth the investment!  

Topics: Dave Kurlan, Consultative Selling, HubSpot, sales commitment, huffington post

Getting Reluctant Salespeople to Fill Their Empty Pipelines

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jun 25, 2012 @ 10:06 AM

empty sales pipelineLast week, I wrote this article about the best time to ask salespeople to fill their pipelines.  One reader asked how to get salespeople to fill their pipelines.

It's an interesting question because your real performers don't have to be asked.  They will keep it filled on their own.  If you are having difficulty getting salespeople to fill their pipeline, then one of several things may be true:

  • They are relatively inexperienced and, while willing, aren't very effective.  This is your best scenario because training and coaching will help these salespeople, but you must both put in the work!
  • They aren't motivated enough to do it.  This describes most account managers who are happy to live off of their existing business.  Unfortunately, while this might be good for them, it isn't very good for you or your business.  While there could be a tremendous amount of business being managed by them, they are not setting a good example for others on the sales force.  The bad significantly outweighs the good unless all you can see is the revenue that they manage, and then you'll be blind to all the bad for which they are responsible.
  • They aren't committed enough to do it.  Bye - It was nice knowing you!  There is no place for this salesperson on your sales force.
  • Their hidden weaknesses prevent them from doing it.  This is your second best scenario, but it will take a lot of training, coaching and time to help them overcome their call-anxiety and some will never overcome it.
So, how do you get them to fill their pipeline?  You make it a condition of continued employment.  You'll provide training and coach those who don't know how; provide training and long-term coaching for those who are uncomfortable; replace those who lack commitment; and redeploy those who aren't motivated to an account management position.  The rest - the real salespeople - don't have to be asked.
How do you distinguish between lack of motivation, lack of commitment, hidden weaknesses and skill gaps? A Sales Force Evaluation will provide you with all of that intelligence and more.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales motivation, sales weaknesses, sales competency, sales commitment, sales skill gaps, sales assessments

The Difference Between Sales Commitment and Work Ethic

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Sep 29, 2011 @ 08:09 AM

workethicWhen a sales force evaluation shows that a salesperson lacks commitment, the most likely remark we hear from management is usually, "but he has such a good work ethic!"  When we ask what they mean by "work ethic", management often say things like:

  • very loyal
  • works long hours
  • long-time employee
  • very responsive to requests
"Works long hours" is obviously the one most consistent with "good work ethic" but the others?  Not so much.  Most important to note is that none of the four responses has anything to do with Commitment.
Sales Commitment is about a salesperson's willingness to do whatever is necessary in order to succeed.  Those necessary things usually don't occur in the office, but in the sales cycle, including:
  • Making calls they might not be comfortable making
  • Asking questions they might not be comfortable asking
  • Pushing back when they might not be comfortable pushing back
  • Having a conversation about money when they aren't comfortable talking about money
  • Saying 'no' to an inappropriate presentation request when it's not comfortable to say 'no'
  • Learning to sell the new way when they might not be comfortable with change
  • Being proactive when their default is to be reactive
  • Hunting for new business when they are most comfortable managing existing accounts
Let's look at the 2011 Boston Red Sox historic collapse which concluded last night with a dramatic and stunning 9th inning loss to the lowly Baltimore Orioles. Moments later the Tampa Bay Rays beat the 1st place New York Yankees in extra innings when they overcame a 7-0 deficit to tie the Yankees in the last half of the 9th.  The Red Sox, who also own the record for the greatest comeback in sports history (2004), had a 9.5 game lead over the Rays on September 1.
Was it lack of commitment or work ethic that fueled their collapse?  
I would say it was both.  Some guys couldn't perform in the clutch - nothing to do with how many hours they practiced or worked out or how hard they worked out.  Mental toughness is a commitment issue.  Some guys were out of shape and either too tired or too sore to perform to expectations.  That is a work ethic problem.
In sales, unlike sports, work ethic is nice, but given a choice between strong work ethic OR strong commitment, I'll take the salesperson with strong commitment.

Topics: sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales commitment, work ethic

12 Differences Between Your Salespeople and Sales Candidates

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Sep 28, 2011 @ 06:09 AM

ComparisonYesterday Jim Sasena and I were reviewing data for a recent subset of the salespeople that Objective Management Group has assessed.  We were analyzing the distribution of the Commitment finding when Jim decided to separate the findings into two groups:

  1. Sales Candidates - those who had applied for positions at your companies.
  2. Existing salespeople - those who were part of a company-wide sales force evaluation.  
While comparing the two sets of data, Jim saw something we had not previously noticed.
 
Salespeople that already work for you are TWICE AS LIKELY to LACK Commitment than candidates applying for sales positions at your company.
 
What are some of the possible reasons for this discrepancy?  Here are 12:
  1. Your salespeople are complacent
  2. Your salespeople are not truly salespeople
  3. You may have moved some of your people into sales roles
  4. You may have selected the wrong people for the role
  5. Your salespeople are taking the path of least resistance
  6. Your salespeople don't have anything to prove
  7. Your salespeople aren't being held accountable
  8. Your sales management isn't recognizing the signs
  9. The candidates will do anything to prove themselves worthy
  10. The candidates are true salespeople
  11. The candidates are more motivated
  12. The candidates want to work
Feel free to add your own thoughts to the comments below...
 
If you are one of the stubborn leaders who hold on to under performing salespeople, thinking the devil you know is better than the devil you don't, get over it.  As long as you are using OMG's predictive sales candidate assessment, you'll surely hire salespeople who are stronger than those you have in place today.
 

Sixteen of the worlds top sales experts are meeting.  I'll be there.

Get a seat at the table.

More information and panel registration.

Tomorrow we'll discuss the difference between Commitment and strong work ethic.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales recruiting, sales commitment, sales candidates, sales selection, sales assessments

Commitment, Hiring Salespeople, Sales Leadership Ego

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Wed, Jun 09, 2010 @ 11:06 AM

Meet the Sales ExpertsOn today's episode of Meet the Sales Experts I'll have a panel of Sales Development Experts talking about some of the recent popular posts on the four blogs hosted right here.

Importance of Commitment

Tips for Hiring Salespeople

Ego of the Sales Leaders (I'm a Sales Guy!)

Listen to us live at 12 Noon ET and, if you have a question you would like answered on the show, send it to me right now or during the show via email.

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales management functions, sales commitment, Sales Experts, tips for hiring salespeople, sales ego

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About Dave

Best-Selling Author, Keynote Speaker and Sales Thought Leader.  Dave Kurlan's Understanding the Sales Force Blog earned a medal for the Top Sales & Marketing Blog award for six consecutive years. This article earned a Bronze Medal for Top Sales Blog post in 2016, this one earned a Silver medal for 2017, and this article earned Silver for 2018. Read more about Dave.

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