Rejection - Why it is the #1 Enemy in Modern Selling

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Apr 03, 2014 @ 08:04 AM

rejectionFor a change, rather than contributing to all the noise about inbound replacing outbound, inside replacing outside, insights replacing sales steps, buyers' process replacing sales process, let's talk about something that has a huge, relevant impact on selling, regardless of how the opportunity came to be.

Most of the sales bloggers don't touch on rejection, but when it does comes up, it's usually in the context of fear, as in fear of rejection.  Objective Management Group (OMG) measures something a bit different: difficulty recovering from rejection.  Fear is real, but it's more telling to understand whether a salesperson jumps right back on the phone, is completely stable for the next meeting, or requires 10 minutes, 10 days or 10 weeks to fully recover.  When viewed as fear, we can assume that a salesperson will avoid scenarios where rejection is possible, but fear makes all salespeople with that weakness identical.  Looking at recovery, instead of fear, allows us to see the difference between short and long recovery periods.

In the past 6 years, rejection has become an even more impactful weakness than it already was.  Today, prospects are much less inclined to take a salesperson's call, return a voicemail or an email message, engage in a conversation, schedule a call or meeting, share important information, return calls to salespeople toward the end of the sales process or make a decision.  That's an awful lot of misery for a salesperson who finds it difficult to recover from rejection!

But rejection isn't that well understood by salespeople, their sales managers or even their sales VP's.  Do you know which of your salespeople have this problem and how severe it is?  Do you know which activities, questions and steps they are unable to execute as a result of their rejection weakness?  Do you know when their rejection problems will get in the way?

Rejection is relative.  The greater the risk, the more likely it is that an individual will avoid the possibility of rejection.  My longtime readers are familiar with our son, who stars in this great series of 32 articles called Salespeople are Like Children.  It's my favorite series, and I've been adding to it since the inception of this blog in 2005 when he was 3.

He is relentless, fearless and passionate about anything he wants from us.  Nothing will stop him.  Ever.  What if Mom and Dad say "No"?  No problem.  I'll ask again.  Another way.  I'll beg.  I'll threaten.  I'll cry.  I'll use logic.  I'll use emotion.  I'll keep at it.  

However, raise the stakes, and everything changes.

When it comes to a certain boy showing interest for the first time in a certain girl, it took weeks for him to gather the courage to ask the question even with the aid of today's technology where he could text the question instead of actually getting on the phone or asking face-to-face.  

What if she says "No"? 

Even worse.  What if she doesn't respond?

In my opinion, not knowing is even worse than the finality of a "no" and that's why salespeople are finding it very difficult to cope with unresponsive prospects and prospects who go into hiding after expressing a desire to do business.

Further relating this example to sales, the stakes go up for some salespeople relative to:

  • the title of the decision maker or contact,
  • the revenue of the prospect company,
  • the name brand of the company,
  • the size of the opportunity,
  • the existence of resistance, 
  • the size of the carrot being dangled, and
  • the increasing likelihood of a sale.

Sales training will not make rejection-related weaknesses disappear.  With most training, the salespeople are given new words to use, but still have the weakness.  As a result, they fail to use their new words, continuing to do what's comfortable, rather than what's most effective.  Even though effective sales coaching can help, you must first know who is susceptible, how severe it is, how often it occurs and exactly when it will get in the way.

A sales force evaluation provides the answers to those questions.

Image credit: iqoncept / 123RF Stock Photo

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales training, Sales Coaching, sales evaluation, sales testing, sales assessments, fear of rejection

Validation of the Validation of the Sales Assessment

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Fri, Oct 04, 2013 @ 06:10 AM

validatedSome companies need to validate our validation.  Objective Management Group (OMG) uses Predictive Validity - the most time-consuming and expensive form of validation.  Unlike simpler methods of validation, Predictive Validity requires that we prove a connection to on-the-job performance.  The challenge is that our predictive validity is so good, some people just don't believe it and they want to revalidate it themselves.

One of the companies that insisted on validating our validation is moving forward with a license to hire 200 salespeople using our Sales Candidate Assessment.  I'll share the results of their own validation:

They conducted a 7-day pilot in April of 2012 and hired 23 salespeople.  

Our assessment recommended 13 of them, and did not recommend 10.  They reported that 9 of the 10 hired (who were not recommended) failed, and that 12 of the 13 (who were recommended) succeeded.  How do those numbers compare to our historical statistics?  

Historically, 75% of the candidates we don't recommend, who somehow get hired anyway, fail inside of 6 months.  In this pilot, 90% of the candidates that were not recommended failed.

Historically, 92% of the candidates we do recommend, who eventually get hired, succeed.  In this pilot, their success rate was also 92%.

Does it always work out like this?  Of course not.  Some companies just don't have the right sales management, sales process and systems in place so even the best candidates can fail or leave.  On the other hand, some companies, who have been using our processes, systems and tools for a while, consistently exceed these results.

The most common scenario where companies wish to do their own validation is when they are located overseas.  Despite the fact that our expansion overseas began more than a decade ago, some companies located outside of the US don't believe that a US-based tool will work in their country.  They have cultural differences to be sure, but those are more about relationships and the proper times and appropriate ways for people to interact in business settings.  Selling and what it takes for salespeople to succeed doesn't actually vary from culture to culture.  

Some countries lack selling sophistication - they're way behind - and are still selling very transactionally.  But if the company is ready to change, and their markets are ready for them to change, then they must be able to select salespeople who can make those changes as well.

Validation is an interesting process and if you look into it, you'll find that none of the personality or behavioral styles assessments use predictive validity because there simply isn't a correlation between their findings and on-the-job performance.

Topics: sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales evaluation, sales profile, Validation, sales test, objective management group

Why Your Lowest Price Can Be a Barrier to Closing Sales

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Aug 02, 2012 @ 17:08 PM

Price Comparison and Sales ContextIt's not really the price as much as it's the context for which that price is provided.  Let's take mobile apps for example.

$9.99 on its own seems very inexpensive, but with apps available for $3.99, $1.99, $.99 and even free, it's expensive - by comparison.  Look at the moon - we think it's fairly large, but when you look at it in comparison to Earth and Mercury's moon, it's a blip in the sky!

Let's look at a more complex service with a much higher price tag.  If the salesperson says that their solution is only $5,000 per person, the prospect immediately views this as an expense - and a costly one at that.  How can they justify spending on average $5,000 per person?  However, if the salesperson says, "We can help you recover $3 million in lost revenue and solve your customer retention problem for around $50,000 over the next 8-12 months", it sounds like a bargain and a no-brainer.  The reality is that the $50,000 solution could be more costly even than the $5,000 per person solution.  But the context, the perceived value and expected result are different.

It's not about prices, presentations or building value; it's about putting prices in the context of what those prices will buy.  Compare the two examples above and you'll see both the answer and the obstacle.  The answer is the context.  The obstacle is that your salespeople may not be learning what the compelling reason is for their prospects to spend the money.  Without the compelling reason, it's impossible to replace the red-bolded words above with the words your salespeople need to use.

Another potential obstacle, but hidden this time, is that some of your salespeople are uncomfortable having financial discussions with their prospects.  Those salespeople won't be able to get to the quantification of the problem.  And what about the salespeople who need to be liked?  They can't ask the tough questions and become emotional if they go out on a limb and ask.  These are three of the many hidden weaknesses that OMG often finds when evaluating sales forces.

You can teach and coach on most strategies and tactics, but when your salespeople aren't able to execute one that was properly introduced and demonstrated through role-play, you can be sure that there is a hidden weakness to blame.

Topics: sales competencies, sales culture, sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales force evaluation, sales training, sales evaluation, sales personality, hidden sales weaknesses, selling value, overcoming price objections

What Leads to Salespeople Underperforming?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jul 16, 2012 @ 08:07 AM

focusAs a baseball fan, it drives me mad when underperforming players don't play because of one nagging injury after another.  It makes me wonder whether their injuries are causing them to underperform or their "injuries" are convenient excuses for their lack of performance.  We usually don't know, but it sets up my next question.

Doesn't it drive you mad when terrific, yet underperforming salespeople, take time off for their car to be serviced, to bring their pets to the vet, to spend time with visiting family members, to work out of the house, when they feel under the weather, to meet a with a contractor, for the dentist, for their annual physical, etc?  Take a vacation - no problem - but if you're not on vacation, then work for crying out loud!  

The funny thing is that your overachievers may include these same things in their very busy schedules.  The difference is that you either don't know about it, because they only spend the hour it actually takes to get it done instead of the entire day, or they don't do these things during their selling time.

Why do you suppose your underperformers are always coming up with things that cause them to take time off?  Are those distractions the very reasons why they are underperforming or are they merely symptoms of their lack of focus, discipline, commitment, or work ethic?

I know from personal experience that when I am focused on results, I never have time for golf.  Can't justify it.  However, when I have focused on golf, I didn't get the business results which I'd expected.  That's just the way it works.  People will get results, not by accident, but only when they are completely focused on the activities, behaviors, work, flow and relationships that lead to results and when they are disciplined enough to remain focused and active for as long as it takes to achieve those results.

How do you keep a salesperson focused and disciplined?  Those are the very salespeople who must be micro-managed, but don't be surprised if those same salespeople resist your efforts.  They may not want to be so focused and disciplined, meaning that you aren't on the same page.  When that's the case, it just might be time for a change of scenery.  They do that with ballplayers....

Topics: sales competencies, sales culture, sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales management, Sales Coaching, sales performance, sales evaluation, sales personality, underachieving, underperformance, overachiever

How Do Sales Professionals Stay Motivated?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Jul 12, 2012 @ 09:07 AM

sales motivationThis was the question posed at Focus.com. 

When I reviewed the page, there were 18 other answers to the question.  There was nothing particularly wrong with them, but they just weren't transferable or scalable.  They didn't answer the question of how sales professionals stay motivated as much as they answered how certain salespeople motivate themselves and how certain sales managers motivate others.

The most important thing to understand is that when someone must ask how to motivate their salespeople, they may not have the right salespeople!

The best salespeople don't have to be motivated - they just are - and it not something they have to do.  Sure, they are goal-orientated.  Sure, they are disciplined.  Sure, they love praise and recognition.  But salespeople who love what they do and love either the thrill of success or the sight of their growing bank account are pre-motivated.  Think pre-washed or pre-faded jeans. They come to the table wired for it.

The real issue is what to do about those who aren't wired for it.  The easy answer is to evaluate the sales force and, as part of that process, look for the data which will tell you who is motivated; not in general terms, but specifically for success in sales.  Who can be developed and how much improvement are they likely to show?  You may learn that you don't have the right salespeople in the right roles and may need to make some changes.

You'll also see this problem with veteran salespeople who have made a lot of money and have become complacent.  Just because they have succeeded in the past, doesn't mean they will continue to succeed in the future.  And did they really succeed in the past or did they make a bunch of money because they inherited lucrative accounts?

Change is the best way to motivate a complacent sales force.  Send a message that they can all be replaced and that you are willing to make those changes.

Read more of my articles on sales force motivation.

 

Topics: sales competencies, sales culture, sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales motivation, sales evaluation, sales personality, sales development

Are (Lack of) Results Due to the Salesperson or the Company?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jul 09, 2012 @ 10:07 AM

resultsI'll open with a baseball analogy:  A few weeks ago, the Boston Red Sox traded Kevin Youkilis - a disgruntled, underperforming, 3-time all-star - to the Chicago White Sox AND the Red Sox paid most of his remaining 2012 salary.  In return, they received a couple of unspectacular spare parts.  What has happened since?  Youkilis reverted to form and quickly became a fan favorite in Chicago.  The Red Sox continue to lose games and underperform.  So, the question is: Was it Youkilis or the team that caused him, and just about everyone not named David Ortiz, to underperform this year?

Now the sales connection:  Whether your salespeople are underperforming or doing well, are they responsible or is it your company, culture, advertising or offerings that's responsible?

Using data from the 600,000+ salespeople and sales managers whom OMG assessed, we know that salespeople, who work for industry leaders, do well because of their company's reputation, advertising and offerings.  We know that in underdog companies (pricier than competition, high-ticket, new company, new technology, story to tell, pioneer, etc.), when salespeople are underperforming, it is usually because of the salespeople, not the company.

Sales is not like other roles.  A salesperson's successful performance at one company does not necessarily translate to success in a different role or at another company, much like certain baseball players don't perform well in the Boston or New York markets, despite having the ability to perform at a high level for smaller market teams.

As selling continues to be more challenging, companies must make dramatic improvements at sales selection and development.  Specifically, sales leaders at all levels must follow best practices for the sales selection process, on-boarding and ongoing development.  OMG's data also shows that 86% of all sales managers don't perform any of those three roles very well. 

When sales managers are ineffective at selecting the right salespeople, they compound the problem by being equally ineffective at coaching - the foundation of ongoing development.

Training salespeople is nice, but a waste of time and money when the wrong salespeople are trained and sales managers aren't prepared to coach to and hold salespeople accountable to the training.

It's time to fix these problems, not turn a blind eye.  

Topics: sales competencies, sales culture, sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales training, sales management, Sales Coaching, sales management training, sales evaluation, omg, sales personality

Can Your Salespeople Sell More Effectively by Asking More Questions?

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Fri, Oct 22, 2010 @ 10:10 AM

QuestionsBy now most executives understand the role and importance of questions in the sales process.

More questions?  Okay.

Better questions?  Sure.

Tougher questions?  Makes sense.

Questions that result in the kind of conversations that none of your competitors are having with your prospects?  Sounds great.

But can your salespeople do this?  Yes, they can ask more questions but, without considerable training and coaching, over a period of months, those questions won't be better or tougher and won't result in those incredible conversations that your competitors aren't having with your prospects.

Selling by asking questions is hard.  A list of questions isn't the answer.  Left to their own devices, your salespeople won't be able to create the kind of questions that are needed.  You might not be able to either.

As an example, I asked a group of salespeople to create a list of 12 questions that would uncover compelling reasons - tougher questions than they usually ask.  As usual, I received questions to the ones they have always asked - commodity driven, lame, no different from their competitors.

Here is an example of one question and how it should be asked instead:

EXAMPLE: What kind of initiatives are you currently considering?

This is a good example of what salespeople from most industries do - they troll for opportunities which, when identified, are littered with competitors!  Commercial Realtors and Insurance Agents are great examples of salespeople who consistently do this wrong, shot gunning for lease and policy expirations as the events that would allow them to book appointments - along with every one of their competitors!  Those "opportunities" are ripe for price concessions and become bidding contests!  Unless your salespeople are REALLY effective at asking tough questions to move to an earlier stage of the sales process and differentiate your company, you'll find yourself presenting, proposing, chasing and giving away margin - if you win. 

Instead, you want your salespeople identifying problems that don't yet have initiatives, expiration dates or time lines attached to them.  The problems, when exposed, diagnosed, explored, expanded and quantified, create urgency to solve those problems and your salespeople are now in an enviable position, as trusted advisers, to solve them.  So what should your salespeople ask instead of the "what kind of initiatives" question?

How about, "in the area of _____(what you solve, not what you sell)_________, what is your single biggest frustration?"

Regardless of what you've been told, this is the foundation of Consultative Selling.  An analysis of a random group of 2,000 salespeople from dozens of various industries, assessed by Objective Management Group this week, shows the following:

The average percentage of the Attributes present in the Consultative Skill Set (Consultative Selling) is only 33%.  In one company, the top scoring salesperson had only 52% of the attributes.

So what can you make of all this?  Asking questions is the most important of all the sales SKILLS and this skill is the most difficult of all to understand, learn, internalize, apply and master.  Don't fool yourself into thinking that understanding and learning translate into application and mastery.  Only practice, use, coaching and accountability will cause that to happen!

Topics: Dave Kurlan, sales training, Sales Coaching, asking questions, sales evaluation, SPIN, sales assessments

Top 20 Requirements - How Salespeople Can be Better at Closing

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Thu, Jun 10, 2010 @ 07:06 AM

HandshakeIf you were to ask most executives for one thing that they would like their sales force to do better, you would likely get one of two answers:

  1. Close
  2. Prospect 

Nothing wrong with those two choices - or is there? 

While salespeople can get better at closing, closing is an outcome, and with the exception of real estate and banking, not really an event. When we evaluate sales forces and look at their ability to close, they may possess some of the strengths and skills that are part of the Sales Core Competency called Closing, but  most of those attributes are used prior to, not during, closing time. The ability to close depends on the following 20 variables (in no particular order) that a salesperson brings to the table - or not:

  • use of an optimized, formal, sales process
  • their severity of Need for Approval
  • whether their Buy Cycle (the way they buy things) supports or sabotages sales efforts
  • their Consultative Selling skill set
  • ability to identify the compelling reasons to buy
  • ability to quantify problems and build value
  • how thoroughly they qualify their prospect, competition and own company
  • whether they present early in the process or late in the process
  • ability to provide both a needs and cost appropriate solution
  • timing - whether they close when the opportunity is actually closable
  • ability to eliminate potential stalls, put-offs, objections and excuses prior to closing time
  • how much Fear of Rejection they have
  • ability to remain optimistic in the face of obstacles and pessimistic when things are going too smoothly
  • ability to develop a relationship early in the process 
  • ability to be realistic
  • ability to solve problems
  • exceptional questioning and listening skills
  • ability not to assume anything without validating their assumptions
  • ability to differentiate your company from all others through questioning
  • how trusting they are

When a sales manager asks for a seminar on closing, good sales experts push back and question the logic behind that, all the while knowing that a session on closing is a waste of time if the salespeople aren't doing these 20 other things effectively.  And of course, it's important to know whether they can and will do those 20 other things effectively. Inexperienced and somewhat less successful and/or effective colleagues might simply agree to provide the seminar without understanding or caring that it won't change a thing.

Is prospecting, or as executives see it, scheduling more appointments, any different? Is that a skill?   We'll explore prospecting next time.

Topics: sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, Sales Force, closing, sales evaluation

Sales Assessment Comparison - Objective Management Group versus Devine

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Sep 14, 2009 @ 13:09 PM

It's not often that we get to compare the assessment results of an individual that took our assessment and another.  Why?  Because most companies don't use multiple assessments that report on similar findings.  Notice that I said "report on" and not "look at".  While other assessments report on findings similar to ours, they don't look at or measure the same information to draw their conclusions.  That's why the reports I received today make for such an enjoyable comparison.

The candidate was assessed by Objective Management Group AND Devine, a company that produces behavioral styles assessments that are marketed and sold as sales assessments.  Because their questions are not asked in a sales context, they get findings that, while likely accurate in social situations, are usually out of context, and  less accurate for sales.  That is why, as is often the case, the results between ours and behavioral styles assessments are contradictory.

Below, you'll see how this candidate scored on ten of the key findings for each assessment:

Variation
OMG Finding
Devine Finding
Conflicting Finding
Strong Desire
Questionable - Ambition & Drive
Conflicting Finding
Strong Responsibility
Questionable - Accepts Responsibility
Conflicting Finding
Strong Outlook
Questionable Outlook
Conflicting Finding
Is Trainable
Questionable - Challenge/Growth/Change
Similar Finding
Gets Emotionally Involved
Questionable Emotionally Objective
Conflicting Finding
74% Hunter Skills
Poor Sales Prospecting
Conflicting Finding
Decision Maker
Poor - Resists Think it Overs
Similar Finding
Some Need for ApprovalPoor - Lacks Need for Approval
Similar Finding
75% Ambassador Skills
Excellent Relationship Effectiveness
Conflicting Finding
Ineffective Selling System
Excellent Process Orientation

 

Seven out of ten findings shown here are in conflict.  Knowing that our accuracy is legendary (95% predictive validity), which assessment would you rather base your decision on?

There are two more findings that you should know about:

OMG also measures commitment - the candidate's commitment was weak and the finding was Lacks Commitment.  Behavioral styles assessments can't measure commitment to sales success.

OMG's recommendation was "not hirable".  Devine's recommendation was "Good Overall Job Fit".  Now which assessment would you rather base your decision on?

If you want to read more about the difference between assessments that were built for sales versus those that were adapted - and not too effectively - for sales, here are three on the subject:

This was the first in the series.

Then came this follow up with more detail.

Then came this article after certain PHD's had their world rocked.

(c) Copyright 2009 Dave Kurlan

 

Topics: sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales hiring, Sales Candidate, sales evaluation, Devine, personality test

How to Get the Entire Sales Force to Change - Now

Posted by Dave Kurlan on Mon, Jul 27, 2009 @ 13:07 PM

Let's discuss how difficult it is to change.

Let's start with a result of change:

In one week I:

  • lost 8 lbs.
  • stopped taking all of my toxic prescription medications and over the counter remedies
  • got my energy back
  • lost 3 inches around my waist
  • fit into my clothes again
  • discovered great flavor in foods that I previously didn't like
  • don't feel bloated anymore after eating

To make this even more dramatic, I was the person who, although usually quite open to ideas and criticism, was totally resistant when it came to food.  Quite simply, I loved my food, I wouldn't give up my favorites, and I couldn't imagine going without bread or ice cream.

Why and how this happened are not as important as what happened.

Most people don't change because they are:

  • afraid of it,
  • uncomfortable with it,
  • don't want to give things up, or
  • don't want to take things on.
For me it was the latter two.

But one day, inspired by my wonderful wife, in one dramatic moment, I made a decision.  And it was a decision that I intended to commit to, without exception.  You see it's the exceptions that can get you in trouble...."just this once"..."I deserved it"..."I've already blown today, this week, this month, etc."...

Anyway, the final goal may take some time to accomplish but the change takes place immediately.  And the initial results of that change provide the ongoing motivation to continue.  The food I was worried about missing?  After three days I didn't care anymore.

Now lets discuss your company and the sales organization.  What have you been afraid to change?

  • Evaluating your Sales Force?
  • implementing an Effective Recruiting Process?
  • Installing Sales Force Automation?
  • Making Your Sales Systems and Processes more effective? 
  • Developing Your Salespeople?
  • Holding Salespeople Accountable?
  • Daily Coaching?
  • Getting Salespeople to Resist Presenting?
  • Getting Salespeople to ask better questions?
  • Being tougher?
  • Overcoming weaknesses like Need for Approval and Rejection
  • Bringing in an Outside Sales Development Expert?
  • Spending Money?
  • Replacing non-performers?
  • Terminating relationships?

There really isn't a hard part. There's simply a decision and once you've made it you're already working on the good stuff so you don't have much time to think about the decision, what you've given up, what you've taken on, your fear or your discomfort.  Nike had it right all along.  Just do it.

(c) Copyright 2009 Dave Kurlan

Topics: sales assessment, Dave Kurlan, sales management, Sales Coaching, Salesforce, Sales Force, sales motivation, resistance to change, sales evaluation, Sales Accountability

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Best-Selling Author, Keynote Speaker and Sales Thought Leader.  Dave Kurlan's Understanding the Sales Force Blog earned a medal for the Top Sales & Marketing Blog award for six consecutive years. This article earned a Bronze Medal for Top Sales Blog post in 2016, this one earned a Silver medal for 2017, and this article earned Silver for 2018. Read more about Dave.

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